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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |North Africa| ▸ |Carthage||View Options:  |  |  |   

Carthage

Carthage, located in North Africa on the Gulf of Tunis, established a hegemony over other Phoenician settlements throughout the Mediterranean, North Africa and what is now Spain. Carthage was in a constant state of struggle with the Roman Republic, which led to a series of conflicts known as the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city of Carthage, the annexation by Rome of all remaining Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire population of Carthage.Carthagian Empire Map


Carthage, Zeugitana, c. 310 - 290 B.C.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

Graded "a most attractive good VF" by Mr. Sear.
SH21941. Electrum shekel, Jenkins and Lewis 247 - 250, SNG Cop 137, SGCV II 6462, Choice gVF, a gem, weight 7.575 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain, wearing necklace and triple-drop earring, dot border; reverse horse standing right on double exergual line, pellet lower right, border of dots; excellent strike with dies of finest style; scarce; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, c. 310 - 290 B.C.

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SH30333. Electrum shekel, SNG Cop 137, SGCV II 6462, gVF, weight 7.439 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain, wearing necklace and triple-drop earring, dot border, pellet under chin; reverse horse standing right, three pellets in exergue; fine style; scarce; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Second Punic War, c. 213 - 211 B.C.

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Examples in the Enna hoard and other Sicilian hoards indicate that this coin was struck in Carthage for use in the Sicilian campaign of 213 - 210 BC. Experts disagree on the identity of the portrait; many identifying it as the god Melqart, others as Hannibal or his father.
SH13769. Silver half shekel, SNG Cop 383, Choice EF, weight 3.329 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, obverse laureate male head left (Hannibal or Melqart), dot border; reverse African elephant walking left on exergual line, Punic letter in exergue, linear border; toned; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 350 - 320 B.C.

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Fantastic gold stater from the great enemy of Rome!
SH08971. Gold stater, Müller Afrique p. 84, type 47; SNG Cop Carthage 128 - 129 var., SNG Cop Sicily 973 - 974 var., SGCV II 6451 var, EF, weight 9.16 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage or Sicilian mint, c. 350 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain, wearing necklace and triple-drop earring, dot border; reverse horse standing right on exergual line, border of dots; graffiti on reverse, struck with dies of fine style, ex John Aiello; SOLD


Carthago Nova, Iberia, 237 - 209 B.C., Portrait of Hannibal(?)

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The obverse portrait is identified by most numismatists as an uncertain male, either Hannibal or the god Melqart. The portrait could be Melqart with the features of Hannibal.
SH54905. Silver shekel, SNG BM 104 ff., Burgos 535, SGCV II 6568, gVF, flat centers, weight 6.648 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, obverse beardless male head (Hannibal?) left; reverse horse standing right, palm tree behind; ex Tom Cederlind; SOLD


Sicily, Siculo-Punic, 4th Century B.C.

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"The types too are generally considered to be Carthaginian, especially that of the horse's head by itself, which is taken as a reference to the myth recounted by Vergil, that the companions of Dido on her expedition to found Carthage 'dug up a horse's head at the spot indicated by Juno.' Moreover, according to Stephanus, Carthage was also called KAKKABH, a word that in Punic means 'the head of a horse'." -- Eckhel, Doctrina I (1792), pp. 229-230. Eckhel himself has some hesitation about accepting this explanation of the type, however, because of the appearance of a similar horse's head type on early Roman didrachms with the inscription ROMA.
SH08966. Silver tetradrachm, Müller Afrique p. 76, type 23; SNG Cop (Zeugitania) 86; SNG Cop (Sicily) 982, EF, extraordinary high relief, superb style, some mint luster, weight 16.84 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Sicilian mint, c. 320/315 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Kore-Tanit left, wreathed in barley, wearing triple-pendant earring, and necklace, four dolphins around swimming clockwise; reverse horse's head left, date palm behind, Punic letter M below; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Siculo-Punic, "Questor" Series, c. 300 - 289 B.C.

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"The types too are generally considered to be Carthaginian, especially that of the horse's head by itself, which is taken as a reference to the myth recounted by Vergil, that the companions of Dido on her expedition to found Carthage 'dug up a horse's head at the spot indicated by Juno.' Moreover, according to Stephanus, Carthage was also called KAKKABH, a word that in Punic means 'the head of a horse'." -- Eckhel, Doctrina I (1792), pp. 229-230. Eckhel himself has some hesitation about accepting this explanation of the type, however, because of the appearance of a similar horse's head type on early Roman didrachms with the inscription ROMA.
SH15387. Silver tetradrachm, Jenkins Punic IV, Series 5b, EF, weight 16.251 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 90o, c. 300 - 289 B.C.; obverse Melkart-Herakles head right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck; reverse horse head left, palm behind, Punic inscription below; fantastic eye appeal, toned; SOLD


Carthaginians in Sicily, 325 - 300 B.C.

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In 311 B.C., Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse, invaded the Carthaginian holdings on Sicily and laid siege to Akragas. Hamilcar led the Carthaginian response, and by 310 controlled almost all of Sicily and laid siege to Syracuse itself. In desperation, Agathocles secretly led an expedition of 14,000 men to Africa, hoping to save his rule by leading a counterstrike against Carthage itself. Carthage was forced to recall Hamilcar and most of his army from Sicily. Agathocles was eventually defeated in 307 B.C., but he escaped back to Sicily and negotiated a peace which maintained Syracuse as a stronghold of Greek power in Sicily.
SH12231. Silver tetradrachm, SGCV II 6436, SNG Cop 983, EF, weight 17.096 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse head of young Herakles clad in lion's skin; reverse horse's head, l.; palm tree behind, Punic legend AMHMHNTE (people of the camp) below; beautiful coin; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 325 - 300 B.C.

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At the height of its prominence, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Rivalry with Rome led to a series of conflicts, the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
SH14068. Silver tetradrachm, SGCV II 6438, Jenkins 314, SNG Cop 89, Choice EF (ICG EF45), weight 16.48 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 315o, military camp mint, obverse Melkart-Herakles head right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck; reverse horse head left, palm behind, Punic inscription (People of the Camp) below; rarely this well centered, beautifully toned, fantastic eye appeal; SOLD


Carthago Nova, Iberia, c. 237 - 209 B.C., Portrait of Hannibal(?)

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The obverse portrait is identified by most numismatists as an uncertain male, either Hannibal or the god Melqart. The portrait could be Melqart with the features of Hannibal.
SH54903. Silver 1/4 Shekel, SNG BM 117 ff., Villaronga CNH 66, SGCV II 6572, VF, weight 1.640 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, obverse beardless male head (Hannibal?) left; reverse horse standing right, palm tree behind; some light scratches on reverse, some surface granularity, as is common for this issue, lightly toned, portrait in pleasing style; rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

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Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 13, 2019.
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Carthage