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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Youth||View Options:  |  |  |   

Youth (Juventas)

Juventas is Roman goddess of youth and before she married Heracles was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving nectar and ambrosia. Boy's offered Juventas a coin when they put on the adult men's toga for the first time.


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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Following tradition, when young Nero was elevated to princeps juventutis (prince of youth) in 51 A.D., the equestrian order (Roman knights) gave him a silver buckler (a small round shield) and lances. Coins depicting these traditional gifts were issued for Caius and Lucius, when they were designated princeps juventutis in the time of Augustus. Aurei and denarii with the same types were struck for Nero at Rome. Due to the rarity of the type and the lack of S C on the reverse, it was long believed this type was funded by the knights for distribution as gifts to attendees at the event where Nero was given his buckler and lances. In SNR 63 (1984), von Kaenel re-attributed this type to a Thracian mint. A few dozen examples are know and some, according to RPC I, were found in Thrace.
RB88176. Orichalcum sestertius, von Kaenel Thrakien, type A (unlisted dies); RIC I Claudius 108 (R4); BMCRE p. 195 note, pl. 37, 4; BnF II Claudius 288; Cohen I 99; see RPC I p. 311, aVF, dark brown near black patina, minor roughness, weight 26.001 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Balkan or Thracian mint, as caesar, 51 - 54 A.D.; obverse NERONI CLAVDIO DRVSO GERMANICO COS DESIG, bare headed and draped bust right; reverse EQVESTER / OR-DO / PRINCIPI / IVVENT in four lines on a buckler (small round shield), lance vertical behind; ex CNG e-sale 424 (11 Jul 2018), lot 434; ex CNG e-sale 174 (10 Oct 2007), lot 204; ex CNG auction 67 (22 Sep 2004), lot 1316; ex Michael Weller Collection; very rare; $1170.00 (0) ON RESERVE


Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D.

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Diadumenian was so named because he was born with a caul that formed a 'diadem.' A caul is a piece of membrane that can cover a newborn's head and face. Birth with a caul is rare, occurring in fewer than 1 in 80,000 births. The caul is harmless and is immediately removed by the physician or midwife upon delivery of the child.
SH82698. Silver denarius, RSC III 12; RIC IV M107.1a (S), Hunter III 1, cf. BMCRE V p. 508, M82 (antoninianus, but denarius noted); SRCV II -, Choice gVF, excellent reverse, full circles strike, obverse die wear/rust, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.447 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 1st emission, c. 11 Apr - 31 Jan 217; obverse M OPEL DIADVMENIANVS CAES, bare-headed and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINC IVVENTVTIS (Prince of Youth), Diadumenian standing slightly left, head left, in military dress, baton in right hand, scepter nearly vertical in left hand, legionary aquila and standard topped with a wreath on right standing in ground behind him; scarce; SOLD


Maximus, Caesar, 235 or 236 - 24 June 238 A.D.

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When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
SH89839. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 13, BMCRE V 213, Hunter III 11, Cohen IV 14, SRCV III 8411, gF, excellent portrait, well centered, edge split, weight 23.265 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, early 236 - Apr 238 A.D.; obverse MAXIMVS CAES GERM, bare-headed and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Maximus standing left, head bare, short scepter in right hand, transverse spear in left hand, two military standards behind, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 73 (6 Jan 2019), lot 543; scarce; SOLD


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Juventas is Roman goddess of youth and before she married Herakles was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving nectar and ambrosia. Boy's offered Juventas a coin when they put on the adult men's toga for the first time.
RB32849. Copper as, RIC III AP1238a, BMCRE IV 1407, Cohen III 393, Hunter II 39, SGCV II 4831, VF, weight 10.947 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 143 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR PII F COS, bare head right; reverse IVVENTAS, Juventas standing left, offering incense with right at altar-candelabrum on left, patera in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking thighs; very scarce; SOLD


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D.

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In 145, many thousands of acres of Roman Britain, in modern-day Lincolnshire, England, were inundated by a great flood.
RB76161. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 256a (S), Cohen V 49, Hunter III 14, SRCV III 9249, Choice VF, excellent boy portrait, well centered, nice patina, a few marks, slightest corrosion in some areas, weight 20.220 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 244 - 246 A.D.; obverse M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPIA IVVENTVTIS (in honor of the Prince of Youth), Philip II standing left, bare-headed, in military dress, globe in right hand, inverted spear behind in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; scarce; SOLD


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Juventas is Roman goddess of youth and before she married Herakles was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving nectar and ambrosia. Boy's offered Juventas a coin when they put on the adult men's toga for the first time.
RB51525. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III AP1232a (S), BMCRE IV MA1397, Cohen III 392, Hunter II 38 var. (slight drapery), SRCV II 4804 var. (draped), gF, weight 27.727 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 140 - 144 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII F COS, bare head right; reverse IVVENTAS (youth), Juventas standing slightly left, head left, draped, dropping incense with left hand onto altar on left, patera in right hand, S - C (senatus consulto) across field; scarce; SOLD


Maximus, Caesar, 235 or 236 - 24 June 238 A.D.

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When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RB84929. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 13, BMCRE V 213, Hunter III 11, Cohen IV 14, SRCV III 8411, aVF, perfect centering, nice portrait, porous, weight 21.246 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, early 236 - Apr 238 A.D.; obverse MAXIMVS CAES GERM, bare-headed and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Maximus standing left, head bare, short scepter in right hand, transverse spear in left hand, two military standards behind, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; scarce; SOLD


Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

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In 283, Carus left Carinus in charge of the West and moved with Numerian and his praetorian prefect Arrius Aper to the East to wage war against the Sassanid Empire. The Sassanids had been embroiled in a succession dispute since the death of Shapur and were in no position to oppose Carus' advance. According to Zonaras, Eutropius, and Festus, Carus won a major victory against the Persians, taking Seleucia and the Sassanid capital of Ctesiphon (near modern Al-Mada'in, Iraq), cities on opposite banks of the Tigris. In celebration, Numerian, Carus, and Carinus all took the title Persici maximi.
RA85606. Billon antoninianus, Venra IV 1927 (12 ex.); RIC V-2 361; Cohen VI 76; Hunter IV 2 var. (KA∆); SRCV III -, Choice VF, excellent portrait, attractive surfaces, light marks, light encrustations, weight 3.172 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, as caesar, Nov/Dec 282 - Feb/Mar 283 A.D.; obverse M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVT (to the Prince of Youth), Numerian standing left, baton pointed downward in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, ∆KA in exergue; SOLD


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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In 175, Commodus, son of Marcus Aurelius and his wife Faustina, was made caesar. This coin was dedicated to the new caesar, the "Prince of Youth."
RS67701. Silver denarius, RSC II 607, SRCV II 5540, RIC III MA601 var. (bust draped), BMCRE IV MA640 var. (same), Hunter II 3 var. (same), VF, unusual portrait, weight 3.169 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 175 A.D.; obverse COMMODO CAES AVG FIL GERM, bare headed bust right, from behind, with cuirass and only slight drapery; reverse PRINC IVVENT (Prince of Youth), Commodus standing slightly left, head left, wearing short tunic and chlamys, branch downward in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, trophy of captured arms with shield at base standing behind; rare with this bust; SOLD


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Divi Filius in the obverse legend declares that Domitian is "son of the divine." His father, Vespasian, had been deified by the Senate and Domitian was now the son of a god.
RS79262. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 Titus 266 (C2); RSC II 397a; BMCRE II Titus 92; BnF III Titus 76; SRCV I 2676, Choice aVF, toned, centered, weight 3.455 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar under Titus, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head right; reverse PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS (the first of youths), flaming and garlanded altar; ex Forum (2014); SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Thursday, November 14, 2019.
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Youth