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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Osiris||View Options:  |  |  |   

Osiris

Osiris was the Egyptian god of the afterlife, the underworld and the dead. Osiris was also associated with the cycles of nature, in particular vegetation and the annual flooding of the Nile. He is classically depicted as a green-skinned man with a pharaoh's beard, partially mummy-wrapped at the legs, wearing a distinctive crown with two large ostrich feathers at either side, and holding a symbolic crook and flail. Osiris was the oldest son of the Earth god Geb, and the sky goddess Nut, the brother and husband of Isis, and father of Horus. The Kings of Egypt were associated with Osiris in death - as Osiris rose from the dead they would, in union with him, inherit eternal life through a process of imitative magic. By the New Kingdom all people, not just pharaohs, were believed to be associated with Osiris at death if they incurred the costs of the assimilation rituals.


5" Egyptian Bronze Figure of Osiris, 26th - 30th Dynasty, 664 - 342 B.C.

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AB31065. Egyptian bronze figure of the god Osiris in mummified form wearing Atef-crown with Uraeus, height 13.0 cm (5"), Choice, braided beard curved at the tip, holding the royal regalia crock and flail; two-sided, loop on back; excellent detail, original patina; SOLD


5" Egyptian Bronze Figure of Osiris, 26th - 30th Dynasty, 664 - 342 B.C.

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AB31082. Egyptian bronze figure of the god Osiris in mummified form, Choice, wearing Atef-crown with Uraeus, braided beard curved at the tip, holding the royal regalia crock and flail; two-sided; excellent detail, original patina, height 13.6 cm (5 1/8"); SOLD


Egyptian Faience Ushabti, 30th Dynasty - Ptolemaic Period, c. 380 - 200 B.C.

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AB31059. 11 cm (4 1/4") high, turquoise faience, Osirian form, holding pick and hoe, seed basket over left shoulder, back pillar, uninscribed, Choice, SOLD


Melita, Malta, c. 150 - 146 B.C.

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Melite or Melita (present-day Mdina) Malta began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, an aristocratic town house, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
GI86525. Bronze AE 26, Calciati III p. 353, 7; SNG Cop VIII 463; SNG Dreer 607; Coleiro 3, F, red-black patina, reverse a little off center, light marks and corrosion, weight 12.228 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, under Roman rule, c. 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse MEΛITAIΩN (clockwise on right), head of Isis (Coleiro says Astarte) left, wearing uraeus crown, composite of symbol of Tanit and caduceus in left field; reverse Osiris kneeling left on left knee, with four open wings, wearing double crown, short scepter in right hand, flail in left hand; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; SOLD


Egyptian Faience Ushabti Inscribed "The Osiris, Hemka Nefer," 30th Dynasty to Ptolemaic Period, c. 664 - 100 B.C.

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Smaller ushabtis are often inscribed "the Osiris" followed by the name of the deceased. Hemka literally means priest and Nefer means good or perfect. Osiris is called "Osiris Hemka" in a sacred text where he begets a son with Isis (who is flying over him as a hawk while he reclines on a lion couch). The inscription may read, "The Osiris, the perfect priest" or more likely reads, "The Osiris" followed by the name of the desceased, "Hemka Nefer."
AW31071. Aquamarine faience, Osirian form, holding pick and hoe, back pillar; a bit carelessly made, 8.4 cm (3 1/4") high, Choice, SOLD


Melita, Malta, c. 150 - 146 B.C.

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Melite or Melita (present-day Mdina) Malta began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, an aristocratic town house, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
RP91500. Bronze AE 26, Calciati III p. 353, 7; SNG Cop VIII 463; SNG Dreer 607; Coleiro 3; Perassi 25Ė40, aF, brown patina, porosity, areas of corrosion, edge cracks, weight 11.527 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, under Roman rule, c. 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse MEΛITAIΩN (clockwise on right), head of Isis (Coleiro says Astarte) left, wearing uraeus crown, stalk of grain left; reverse Osiris kneeling left on left knee, with four open wings, wearing double crown, short scepter in right hand, flail in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; very rare; SOLD


Melita (Mdina, Malta), Under Roman Rule, c. 150 - 146 B.C.

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Melite or Melita was an ancient city located on the site of present-day Mdina, Malta. It began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
GI84544. Bronze AE 26, Calciati III p, 353, 7; Coleiro 3; SNG Cop 463; SNG Dreer 607; SNG Morcom -; SNG Evelpidis I -, F, brown tone, slightly irregular flan, small edge cracks, weight 11.397 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, c. 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse MELITAIWN (downward on right), veiled female (Astarte) head right, with ureus and lotus crown, sign of Tanit combined with caduceus left; reverse Osiris kneeling left on one knee, with four spread wings, two coming out from the upper back, two from the lower back, wearing solar disc crown, scepter in right hand, flail in left hand, wearing pinafore and necklace; rare; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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RX52327. Bronze diobol, Kampmann 32.566, Geissen 1074, Dattari 650, Milne 1383, Emmett 1118, BMC Alexandria 775, SNG Cop -, F, weight 8.691 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse Osiris-Canopus jar of Osiris, L - IZ (year 17) flanking across fields; very unusual patina; SOLD


Melita (Mdina, Malta), Under Roman Rule, c. 218 - 175 B.C.

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Melite or Melita was an ancient city located on the site of present-day Mdina, Malta. It began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
GB38694. Bronze AE 29, Calciati III p. 351, 2; Coleiro 2; SNG Cop VIII 458; SNG Evelpidis I 738; SNG Dreer 603; SNG Morcom -, Fair, brown patina, weight 10.321 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 90o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, c. 218 - 175 B.C.; obverse veiled female head right wearing stephane; reverse mummy of Osiris standing facing, head left, holding flail and scepter, between winged figures of Isis and Nephthys, each with wings lowered and crossed in front, each wearing solar disk with horns, each holding palm frond and uncertain object, Punic letters ANN above; very rare; SOLD


Melita (Mdina, Malta), Under Roman Rule, c. 150 - 146 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Melite or Melita was an ancient city located on the site of present-day Mdina, Malta. It began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
GI84545. Bronze AE 26, Calciati III p, 353, 7; Coleiro 3; SNG Cop 463; SNG Dreer 607; SNG Morcom -; SNG Evelpidis I -, aF, green patina, weight 10.719 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 315o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, c. 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse MELITAIWN (downward on right), veiled female (Astarte?) head right, with ureus, wearing lotus crown, sign of Tanit combined with caduceus left; reverse Osiris kneeling left on one knee, with four spread wings, two coming out from the upper back, two from the lower back, wearing solar disc crown, scepter in right hand, flail in left hand, wearing pinafore and necklace; rare; SOLD




  




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Osiris