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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Tarraco||View Options:  |  |  |   

Tarraco, Hispania Tarraconensis (Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain)

Tarraco was inhabited in pre-Roman times by Iberians who had commercial contacts with the Greeks and Phoenicians who settled on the coast. In 217 B.C., Roman forces arrived in Tarraco with Scipio Africanus. The population became allies and friends of the Roman people and Tarraco became a supply and winter base camp during the Roman wars against the Celtiberians. When Caesar conquered supporters of Pompey in 49 B.C., Tarraco supported his army with food. The city was made Colonia Iulia Urbs Triumphalis Tarraco, probably by Caesar after his victory in Munda. In the year 27 BC, Augustus went to Spain to monitor the campaigns in Cantabria. However, due to his poor health he preferred to stay in Tarraco. He and bestowed many marks of honor on the city, among which were its honorary titles of Colonia Victrix Togata and Colonia Julia Victrix Tarraconensis. Tarraco was the capital of the Roman province Hispania Citerior and, after Augustus' reorganization of Hispania, of Hispania Tarraconensis. Tarraco is a UNESCO World heritage site.


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

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With this coin Galba asserts that he has restored freedom, but this was empty propaganda. Galba was notoriously cruel, sentenced many to death without trial, raised taxes, and rarely accepted requests for citizenship.
RS72971. Silver denarius, RIC I 7 (R2); BMCRE I 197, BnF III 4, RSC I 132, Hunter I -, SRCV I -, VF, lightly toned, lightly etched surfaces, weight 3.204 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Tarraco mint, April - late 68 A.D.; obverse GALBA IMPERATOR, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS RESTITVTA (liberty restored), head of Libertas right, hair knotted behind, wearing pearl necklace; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Artcoins auction 6 (10 Dec 2012), lot 800 (the one and only sale of this type on Coin Archives); extremely rare; SOLD


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

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The wreath on the reverse is the corona civica, the oak wreath awarded to Roman citizens ex senatus consulto (by special decree of the Senate) for saving the life of another citizen by slaying an enemy in battle. It became a prerogative for Roman emperors to be awarded the Civic Crown, originating with Augustus, who was awarded it in 27 B.C. for saving the lives of citizens by ending the series of civil wars. The shield in the center commemorates the golden shield awarded to Augustus by the Senate for his virtue, piety, justice and clemency, which was kept on display in the Curia Iulia.
SH72982. Silver denarius, RIC I 47 (R2), RSC II 282, BMCRE I 190, BnF III 28, Hunter I 71, SRCV I -, VF, hoard patina, some smoothing around bust, weight 3.439 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, Tarraco mint, 3 Apr - Aug 68 A.D.; obverse GALBA IMPERATOR, laureate head right, globe at point of bust; reverse S P Q R on round shield, surrounded by oak-wreath; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; ex CNG e-auction 202 (14 Jan 2009), lot 195; ex White Mountain Collection; very rare; SOLD


Roman Civil Wars, Revolt of Galba, Governor of Spain, April - June 68 A.D.

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Galba lived in Tarraco for eight years. This coin was issued by Galba as governor of Spain in revolt against Nero. The obverse is copied from Republican denarii struck in 62 B.C. by the moneyer L. Scribonius Libo.
SH63560. Silver denarius, RIC I 9 (R4), RSC II 396, BMCRE I 9, SRCV I 2072, F, toned, weight 3.515 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 225o, Tarraco(?) mint, Apr - Jun 68 A.D.; obverse BON EVENT, young female head (Bonus Eventus) right, fillet around forehead; reverse ROM RENASC, Roma standing right in military garb, Victory on globe in right hand, eagle-tipped scepter over left shoulder in left; bargain priced for this interesting R4 rarity implying the restoration of the Republic!, from the Jyrki Muona Collection; very rare (R4); SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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The attribution of this type to a Spanish mint is based in part on stylistic similarities to Spanish issues of Vitellius.
SH63457. Silver denarius, RIC II 1340, RSC II 630, BMCRE II 361, BnF III -, VF, toned, weight 3.480 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Tarraco(?) mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head left; reverse VICTORIA IMP VESPASIANI, Victory standing left on globe, wreath extended in right, palm over shoulder in left; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 186 (2010), lot 1951; ex Numismatik Lanz auction 109 (2002), lot 342; rare; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
SH68875. Silver drachm, RIC II 1340, RSC II 630, BMCRE II 361, BnF III -, EF, toned, irregular flan, weight 3.164 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Spanish (Tarraco?) mint, c. 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head left; reverse VICTORIA IMP VESPASIANI, Victory standing left on globe, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 170, lot 2037; rare; SOLD


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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Struck in 69 A.D., the Year of the Four Emperors. Vitellius invoked Mars for support against Otho after, according to Tacitus, he was brought the sword of Julius Caesar taken from the temple Mars, signifying he had been elected emperor by the consent of both armies of Germany.
SH70625. Copper as, RIC I 40, BMCRE I 99, Cohen I 25, BnF III 16, VF, weight 11.606 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 225o, Tarraco(?) mint, Jan - Jun 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS IMP GERMAN, laureate head left, globe at point of bust; reverse CONSENSVS EXERCITVVM (with the consent of the Army), Mars advancing left, nude but for cloak, spear in right hand, aquila with vexillum in left, S - C across field; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 3 (30 Nov 2013), lot 509; scarce; SOLD


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

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On the death of Caligula, Galba refused the invitation of his friends to make a bid for the empire, and loyally served Claudius. For the first half of Nero's reign he lived in retirement, until 61, when the emperor bestowed on him the province of Hispania Tarraconensis. In the spring of 68, at the time of Julius Vindex' insurrection in Gaul, Galba was informed of Nero's intention to put him to death. Learning of Vindex's defeat and suicide Galba hesitated to claim the throne. He took the title caesar only after Nero's suicide and after he was told that Nymphidius Sabinus, the Praetorian Prefect, had given him his favor. This type was struck to for Hispania to thank the province for supporting his bid for the purple.
SH73001. Silver denarius, RIC I 21 (R2), RSC II 80, BMCRE I 174, BnF III 10, Hunter I -, SRCV I -, F, centered, dark toning, porous, weight 3.335 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Tarraco mint, c. Apr - late 68 A.D.; obverse GALBA IMP (clockwise from upper right), laureate head right, globe at tip of neck; reverse HISPANIA (clockwise on left), Hispania standing left, draped, poppy and two stalks of grain in extended right hand, two vertical spears and round shield behind in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, this is the first example of this type handled by Forum; very rare; SOLD


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

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Livia was the wife of Augustus, mother of Tiberius, paternal grandmother of Claudius, paternal great-grandmother of Caligula, and maternal great-great-grandmother of Nero. "Suetonius records that in his youth Galba was a favourite of Livia through whose patronage he moved in the most elevated social circles of the Julio-Claudian era." - David Sear in Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol I.
RB86688. Copper as, RIC I 67 (S), BMCRE I 201, Cohen I 50, Hunter I 73, BnF III 36, SRCV I 2132 var. (no P P), gF, scratches, some pitting, holed, weight 11.739 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 180o, Hispania (probably Tarraco?) mint, Sep/Oct - Dec 68 A.D.; obverse SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M TR P P P, laureate head right, globe at point of bust; reverse DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia standing half left, patera in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking at thighs; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, more attractive in hand than the photographs, Coin Archives lists only two specimens of this very rare type and the last sale was in 2009; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

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This type refers to the Parthian surrender to Augustus of the standards which they had taken from Crassus and his slaughtered legions. Augustus took an ovation for this success, entering the city on horseback. He was also honored with a triumphal arch. The clipeus virtutis, Latin for "shield of bravery" was awarded to Augustus by the Senate and people of Rome in 27 B.C. for his "courage, clemency, justice and piety" and displayed in the Curia Iulia.
RS88944. Silver denarius, RIC I 86b, BMCRE I 420, RSC I 267, BnF I 1138, Hunter I 167, SRCV I 1633 var. (head right), VF, toned, attractive portrait, tight flan cutting off part of legends, scratches and marks, banker's mark, weight 3.802 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Patricia (Cordoba) or Tarraco (Tarragona) mint, 18 - 19 B.C.; obverse CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head left; reverse shield inscribed CL V (Clypeus Virtutis) between an aquila left and legionary standard right, S - P / Q - R (Senatus Populusque Romanus) in two divided lines around, SIGNIS / RECEPTIS (standards recovered) in two lines above and below; SOLD


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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Struck in 69 A.D., the Year of the Four Emperors. After Nero's death, four emperors, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, and Vespasian, ruled in a remarkable succession. Vitellius was made emperor by his troops and after defeating Otho. Vespasian was made emperor by his troops and the Danube legions. Vespasian prevailed. Vitellius was slain. His body was dragged through the streets and dumped in the Tiber.
SH63686. Silver denarius, RIC I 27, RSC II 31, BMCRE I 87, gF, weight 3.335 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tarraco(?) mint, Jan - Jun 69 A.D.; obverse IMP GERMAN A VITELLIVS, Laureate head right, globe at point of bust; reverse FIDES EXERCITVVM (the loyalty of the armies), clasped hands ; rare; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Thursday, December 5, 2019.
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Tarraco