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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Hygieia or Salus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hygieia or Salus

Hygieia is usually said to be a daughter of Asklepios, along with her sisters, Panacea and Iaso. Hygieia, though, was the most important of the attendants of Asklepios and was thought by some in antiquity to be not his daughter but his wife. She was more important than other members of the family and more on par with Asklepios himself. Hygieia is remembered today in the word, "hygiene." She appears on numerous coins, usually depicted feeding the sacred snake from a patera. Salus was the Roman goddess of health, identified by the Romans with the Greek Hygiea.


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

On the Certificate, David Sear notes, "a very rare obverse variant and an excellent example of the early "Trajanic" style of Hadrian's portraiture."
SH24853. Gold aureus, BMCRE III p. 250, 84 note; RIC II 46 var. (bust right), Cohen 1368 var. (same), Choice VF, weight 7.124 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 118 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse P M TR P COS II, Salus seated left, feeding snake coiled around altar, SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor) in exergue; ex Freeman and Sear; very rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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To celebrate his escape from the Pisonian conspiracy and assassination attempt in 65 A.D., Nero constructed a temple to Salus, the Roman goddess of health and safety, and honored her on the reverse of his coins.
SH38942. Gold aureus, RIC I 59, Cohen I 313, BnF II 225, SRCV I 1932, gF, weight 7.092 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 65 - 66 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse Salus seated left on high back throne, patera in right, SALVS (health) in exergue; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Odessos, Moesia Inferior

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As first noticed by von Sallet in the Berlin Catalogue, the obverse die of this coin was also used to strike medallions for Marcianopolis and Tomis (see AMNG Marcianopolis 1098 note).
SH85459. Bronze medallion, hexassarion; Varbanov 4434 (R8, same dies), AMNG I/II 2315 (4 specimens), EF, nice dark green patina, well centered on a broad flan, marks and scratches, weight 25.655 g, maximum diameter 36.8 mm, die axis 180o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AVT K M ANT ΓOP∆-IANOC AVΓ, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust left, almost half-length, seen from front, raising right hand in greeting, globe in left hand; reverse O∆HC-C-EITON, On the left, Hygeia standing right, holding phiale in her left hand from which she feeds snake held in her right; to right, Asklepios standing left, holding serpent-entwined staff in his right hand; ex Stack's NYINC auction (9 Jan 2015), lot 261; ex Heritage Long Beach Signature Sale (25 Sep 2013), lot 23297; ex Heritage-Gemini VIII (14 Apr 2011), lot 406; SOLD


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH33752. Silver denarius, RIC IV 77, Cohen III 68, VF, porous, weight 2.444 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVSTI AVG, laureate head right; reverse SALVTI AVGVSTI, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in right from patera in left, altar at feet; well centered; rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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To celebrate his escape from the Pisonian conspiracy and assassination attempt in 65 A.D., Nero constructed a temple to Salus, the Roman goddess of health and safety, and honored her on the reverse of his coins.
SH40513. Silver denarius, RIC I 67, RSC II 318, BMCRE I 90, BnF II 237, Hunter I 30, SRCV I 1945, VF, attractive style, excellent portrait, weight 3.508 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 66 - 67 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse Salus enthroned left, patera in extended right, left elbow on throne, SALVS (health) in exergue; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Kyme, Aiolis

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Hygieia was the Greek goddess of health. She was the daughter of Asklepios, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asklepios learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP85686. Bronze AE 38, SNGvA 1652; Kraft p. 111, 9a; McClean 7927; Rhousopoulous 3547; SNG Cop -; BMC Troas -, Choice VF, full circles strike on a broad flan, excellent portrait, porosity and some minor pitting, weight 21.937 g, maximum diameter 37.5 mm, die axis 180o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, c. 212 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse EΠI CTPA ΦΛA ΠAVCEPΩTOC (prefect, strategos Phla(...) Pauserotos), Hygieia on the left, standing facing, feeding snake held in her arms, head right looking at Asklepios, Asklepios on the right, standing slightly right, head turned back left, wearing himation, leaning on snake entwined staff in his right hand, KYMAIΩN in exergue; ex Divus Numismatik; very rare; SOLD


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

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With this coin Galba claims he assumed the throne for the salvation of the human race. It alludes to a letter Julius Vindex, wrote to him, asking that he, of high birth and established reputation, as an advocate for the human family, take leadership of the empire.
SH40514. Silver denarius, RIC I 211, RSC II 238, aVF/F, toned, weight 3.125 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, obverse IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG, laureate bust right; reverse SALVS GEN HVMANI (salvation of the human race), female figure standing left, right foot on globe, sacrificing from patera over a lighted altar, rudder in left; rare ; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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To celebrate his escape from the Pisonian conspiracy and assassination attempt in 65 A.D., Nero constructed a temple to Salus, the Roman goddess of health and safety, and honored her on the reverse of his coins.
RS86479. Silver denarius, RIC I 67, RSC II 318, BMCRE I 90, BnF II 237, Hunter I 30, SRCV I 1945, VF, centered on a tight flan, weight 3.368 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 66 - 67 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse Salus enthroned left, patera in extended right, left elbow on throne, SALVS (health) in exergue; SOLD


Agrippina Senior, Wife of Germanicus, Mother of Caligula and Agrippa Jr.

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While attributed to Livia in most refernces, this series has provoked considerable discussion in recent years. The dupondii with legend SALVS AVGVSTA are Livia as Salus. She was the only woman in the world with the title AVGVSTA. Her Salus (Health) was of concern to the Senate and the People of Rome. The dupondii with legend PIETAS are Livilla as Pietas. She was seen as Pietas, though thiat type is highly ironic: she would soon be implicated in the murder of her husband. The titles of her husband appear on the reverse, just as they do on an as with his portrait, and a sestertius with the portraits of their twin boys. The third portrait in this series is an Imperial woman as Justitia. She is Agrippina Senior, the third most important Roman woman of the day, widow of Germanicus. She had just achieved ďSome JusticeĒ in her prosecution of her husbands murderers: Piso and Plancina. This story is well-dramatized in the BBC Production of ďI, Claudius.Ē David Vagiís book calls the first two dupondii Livia and Livillla, but disagrees with this last attribution. He suggests Antonia, mother of Germanicus and Claudius. Antonia was a less important woman of the time, though her negatives were less strong. Antonia has little connection with Justitia. The cut across the reverse letters TI may be an ancient commentary (damnatio memoreia) of Tiberius.
SH16473. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC I Livia 46, Cohen Livia 4, gVF, weight 13.037 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 22 - 23 A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Agrippina Senior as Justitia facing right, IVSTITIA below; reverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII around large SēC; attractive with clear diadem decorations, chocolate patina with some brassy areas, lightly smoothed, a small cut across the reverse letters TI; SOLD


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH01665. Silver denarius, RIC II 20, RSC II 134, BMCRE III 48, EF, weight 3.26 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 18 Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (health of the public), Salus seated left, heads of grain in right, left elbow on throne; scarce; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Thursday, November 21, 2019.
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Hygieia or Salus