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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Tripolis||View Options:  |  |  |   

Tripolis, Phoenicia (Tripoli, Lebanon)

The Tripolis mint was established by Aurelian. Coins of Aurelian and Tacitus from Tripolis are not clearly mintmarked, but after Tacitus, Tripolis coins are marked "TR" in the reverse center field. Dates of operation: 270 - c. 286. Mintmarks: TR in center field.


Carus, Early September 282 - c. July or August 283 A.D., Posthumous Consecration Issue

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The consecratio altar type is not listed for Tripolis mint in references held by Forum. A similar type is listed for Antioch.
SH08800. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 -, SRCV -, ANS -, Choice aEF, weight 3.06 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, obverse DIVO CARO AVG, radiate bust right; reverse CONSECRATIO•, flaming altar, T - R across fields, XXI in exergue; dark toning; SOLD


Carinus, First Half of 283 - Spring 285 A.D.

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Aurelian established the Tripolis mint, c. 274 A.D., which minted antoniniani and a few aureus types until it closed during the join reign of Diocletian and Maximian, c. 287 A.D. The Tripolis coins of Aurelian and Tacitus are not clearly mint-marked to identify Tripolis, but after Tacitus, Tripolis coins are marked "TR" in the reverse field. There were several cities within the Roman Empire named Tripolis. The most likely city that hosted the Roman mint was the Tripolis south of Antioch, which today is Tripoli, Lebanon.
RA48319. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 209, EF, full circle centering, some porosity on obverse, weight 4.132 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, as caesar, c. fall 282 - spring 283 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR CARINVS NOB C, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Prince standing right, scepter in left, with right receiving globe from Jupiter (or Carus) standing left, long scepter in left hand, TR in center, XXI in exergue; SOLD


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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RIC does not list this mint mark for the rare antoniniani of Tacitus struck at Tripolis. Possibly unpublished.
RA09638. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 4083 (2 spec.), BnF XII 1815, RIC V-1 -, Hunter IV -, Venèra -, VF, weight 3.98 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, 8th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 2, Dec 275 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), Mars standing left holding branch and spear, shield at feet, H in exergue; very rare; SOLD


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars represented military power as a way to secure peace, and was a father (pater) of the Roman people.
RA87254. Billon double aureliani, MER-RIC 4114 (11 spec.), BnF XII 1847, RIC V-1 214 (R), Hunter IV -, Venèra -, F, well centered, light corrosion, weight 4.323 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, issue 2, Jan - Jun 276; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP• (time of peace and calm), Mars standing left, wearing helmet and military garb, branch in right hand, vertical spear point up and shield at feet in left hand, star lower left, I A in exergue; very rare type, very rare denomination; SOLD


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

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Aurelian established the Tripolis mint, c. 274 A.D., which minted antoniniani and a few aureus types until it closed during the join reign of Diocletian and Maximian, c. 287 A.D. The Tripolis coins of Aurelian and Tacitus are not clearly mint-marked to identify Tripolis, but after Tacitus, Tripolis coins are marked "TR" in the reverse field. There were several cities within the Roman Empire named Tripolis. The most likely city that hosted the Roman mint was the Tripolis south of Antioch, which today is Tripoli, Lebanon.
RB12189. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 625, SRCV IV 13145, Cohen VI 366, Hunter IV -, gVF, desert patina, weight 4.14 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, c. 286 - 287 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jove the protector of the two Emperors), Victory walking right, presenting wreath in right hand to Jupiter, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, Jupiter standing left, globe in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, TR in center, XXI in exergue; SOLD


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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Aurelian established the Tripolis mint, c. 274 A.D., which minted antoniniani and a few aureus types until it closed during the join reign of Diocletian and Maximian, c. 287 A.D. The Tripolis coins of Aurelian and Tacitus are not clearly mint-marked to identify Tripolis, but after Tacitus, Tripolis coins are marked "TR" in the reverse field. There were several cities within the Roman Empire named Tripolis. The most likely city that hosted the Roman mint was the Tripolis south of Antioch, which today is Tripoli, Lebanon.
RB20904. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 333, VF+, weight 3.911 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, 284 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG• (the victory of the Emperor), Emperor, holding globe, standing right, receiving wreath from Victory standing left holding palm, TR in center, XXI in exergue; rare; SOLD


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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The Roman's believed Jupiter granted protection and success to his favorites, who tended to be people in positions of authority similar to his own.
RA20910. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 928, Choice EF, weight 3.684 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), Probus standing right, eagle-tipped scepter in left, with right receiving globe from Jupiter, standing left, long scepter in left hand, * in center, XXI in exergue; scarce mint; SOLD


Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA09288. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 470; SRCV III 12257; Cohen IV 113; Pink VI-2 p. 57, series 2; Hunter IV - (p. clxxii), VF, weight 4.40 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, c. 1 Jan - Oct/Nov 284; obverse IMP C M AVR NVMERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG• (valor of the two emperors), emperor, standing right, receiving globe from Jupiter standing right, holding scepter, star and TR in center, XXI in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

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Aurelian established the Tripolis mint, c. 274 A.D., which minted antoniniani and a few aureus types until it closed during the join reign of Diocletian and Maximian, c. 287 A.D. The Tripolis coins of Aurelian and Tacitus are not clearly mint-marked to identify Tripolis, but after Tacitus, Tripolis coins are marked "TR" in the reverse field. There were several cities within the Roman Empire named Tripolis. The most likely city that hosted the Roman mint was the Tripolis south of Antioch, which today is Tripoli, Lebanon.
RB11719. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-1 390, gVF, weight 4.324 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust left; reverse SOLI INVICTO• (to the invincible sun god), Sol standing half left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, captive at foot, star in left field, KA in exergue; rare; SOLD


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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The Roman's believed Jupiter granted protection and success to his favorites, who tended to be people in positions of authority similar to his own.
RA62646. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 329; Cohen VI 280; cf. Hunter IV 75 (AVG, no pellet in exergue); SRCV IV 12671 (Antioch, Tripolis issue noted), aEF, weight 3.571 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, 285 - 290 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jove the protector of the two Emperors), Emperor on left, standing right, parazonium in left hand, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left and holding scepter, TR in center, XXI• in exergue; near full silvering; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Friday, December 13, 2019.
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Tripolis