Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Heraclea||View Options:  |  |  |   

Heraclea, Thrace (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey)

Heraclea, the Greek city of Perinthos, later known as Heraclea Thraciae to distinguish it from Heraclea Pontica, is now Marmara Ereglisi in the European part of Turkey. The Roman mint was established by Diocletian shortly before his reform and was in use until the times of Theodosius II. Dates of operation: 291 - 450 A.D. Mintmarks: H, HERAC, HERACL, HT, MHT, SMH, SMHT.


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Sarmatians were a large confederation of Iranian people during classical antiquity, flourishing from about the 5th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D. They spoke Scythian, an Indo-European language from the Eastern Iranian family. The Sarmatians moved to an area called Sarmatia; east of Germania and north of the immediate vicinity of the Danube. These barbarous and little know tribes also occupied the vast tracts of modern Russia. In the autumn of 285, in the Balkans, Diocletian encountered a tribe of Sarmatians who demanded assistance. The Sarmatians requested he either help them recover their lost lands or grant them pasturage rights within the empire. Diocletian refused and fought a battle with them, but was unable to secure a complete victory. The Sarmatians would have to be fought again. In 288, Diocletian managed what was probably another rapid campaign against the resurgent Sarmatians. No details survive, but surviving inscriptions indicate that Diocletian took the title Sarmaticus Maximus after 289.
SH87625. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Heraclea 6 (R3), RSC V 488j, cf. SRCV IV 12612 (Trier, Heraclea noted), Hunter IV -, Choice EF, bold full circles strike, excellent portrait, toned, small dark spots, weight 3.138 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 294 A.D.; obverse DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA SARMAT (Victory over the Sarmatians), the four princes sacrificing over tripod before archway in six-turreted fortress enclosure, HA in exergue; very rare (R4); SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
SH54921. Gold solidus, RIC VII Heraclea 102, VF, ex jewelry, weight 4.174 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 326 - 330 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA CAESAR NN (victory of our two princes), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, SMH in exergue; a few punches and scratches; rare; SOLD


Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Julian begun his reign with a monetary reform, introducing the large silvered bronze (AE 1) with a bull reverse, and a votive type for the smaller denomination (AE 3). Another innovation was the change of mint mark at Heraclea, from SMH to HERACL. RIC records the old style mint mark only for the AE1's. We may assume this variant of the votive type with the old SMH mint mark was produced from a single die at the very beginning of the issue.
SH20254. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Heraclea -, LRBC II -, SRCV V -, Hunter V -, gVF, weight 3.729 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 361 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left holding spear and shield; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, SMHB in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Heraclea, the Greek city of Perinthos, later known as Heraclea Thraciea to distinguish it from Heraclea Pontica, is now Marmara Ereglisi in the European part of Turkey. The Roman mint was established by Diocletian shortly before his reform and was in use until the times of Theodosius II. Dates of operation: 291 - 450 A.D. Mint marks: H, HERAC, HERACL, HT, MHT, SMH, SMHT.
SH63908. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Heraclea 107, Cohen VII 23, LRBC II 1911, VF, weight 8.040 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 27 Jun 363 - 17 Feb 364 A.D.; obverse D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA ROMANORVM (the Roman victory), Jovian standing facing, head right, labarum in left, Victory on globe in right hand, HERACΓ in ex; scarce; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.; Perinthus, Thrace; Galba Countermark

Click for a larger photo
All the Latin coins of Perinthus are rare. BMC does not list Perinthus mint, but identifies this type as "barbarous." RIC notes the existence of Balkan sestertii, dupondii, and asses but does not catalog them.

RPC attributes the countermark to Nicaea, Bithynia.
RS77050. Bronze as, Mac Dowall CM pl. VII, RPC I 1762, BMCRE I 391 var. (barbarous); countermark: Pangerl 92, RPC I p. 345 (Nicaea, Bithynia, Apr 68 - Jan 69), VF, c/m: VF, dark blue-green patina, weight 9.665 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, mid 66 - 9 Jun 68 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM IMP, laureate head right, countermark: ΓAΛBA in a rectangular punch; reverse eagle standing facing on ovoid globe, wings open, head right, S - C divided across field above center; rare; SOLD


Severus II, 25 July 306 - Summer 307 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
SH25961. Billon follis, RIC VI Heraclea 30 var. (officina), VF, weight 11.268 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, autumn 306 A.D.; obverse IMP C FLA VAL SEVERVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, HTA in exergue; near full silvering; unlisted officina; very rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
C. Howgego suggests that this might belong with the Thracian group of Neronian coins in Latin (RPC I 1758 ff.).
RB33833. Bronze semis, RPC I Supplement (online) S2-I-5487 (4 spec.), RIC I -, Cohen I -, BMCRE I -, BnF I -, aVF, weight 4.105 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain (Perinthus, Thrace?) mint, c. 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR, bare head right; reverse VICTORIA AVGVSTI (the victory of the Emperor), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; very rare; SOLD


Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The common belief which identifies the bull with the Apis bull is probably wrong. An interesting passage from Dio Chrysostom compares a good ruler to a bull. Also, Julian was most likely born in May, in the sign of Taurus. The stars are probably the two important star clusters in Taurus, Pleiades and Hyades. Taurus or Apis, this bull is pagan and this coin was the last pagan coin type issued by the Empire.
RL55076. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Heraclea 104, gVF, weight 7.515 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 3 Nov 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull right, two stars above, HERACLin exergue; scarce; SOLD


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The mint at Heraclea was opened during the reign of Diocletian in 291 and continued to strike coins until it was closed by Leo I, c. 474 A.D.
RL34259. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Heraclea 7, LRBC II 1930, Cohen VIII 9, SRCV V 19881, VF, weight 3.453 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, chi-rho Christogram above right, left, SMHB in exergue; rare; SOLD


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

Click for a larger photo
The Christogram (also called a Monogramma Christi or Chrismon) is a ligature of Chi (X) and Rho (P), the first two letters of Christ in Greek. It was among the earliest symbols of Christianity. The crucifix was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because most people then had personally witnessed its gruesome use for public execution.
SH08653. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Heraclea 13.1 (S), LRBC II 1956, SRCV V 20609, Cohen VIII 4, gVF, weight 4.02 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, c. 25 Aug 383 - 384 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated right, inscribing Christogram on shield set on column, SMHA in exergue; beautiful coin; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.




Catalog current as of Monday, November 18, 2019.
Page created in 1.532 seconds.
Heraclea