Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Seals||View Options:  |  |  |   

Byzantine Seals

During the Byzantine period, lead bullae (singular, Bulla) were widely used to seal and identify the sender of correspondence and containers in shipment. An iron, pliers-shaped instrument, a boulloterion, was used to impress the designs on a lead bulla seal. After the cord was wrapped around the package or document and the ends inserted in a channel in the blank seal, the seal was placed between the disc shaped engraved dies on the jaws of a boulloterion. The boulloterion had a projection above the jaws, which was struck with a hammer to impress the design on the seal and close the channel around the two ends of the cord. With a bulla in place a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, ensuring the contents remain tamper-proof until they reach their destination.


Jewish, Lead Menorah Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah on Each Side, c. 6th - 10th Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
A bulla (plural, bullae), is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, thereby ensuring the contents remain tamper-proof until they reach their destination.
JD34522. Menorah bulla seal, weight 11.1 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, 8.9 mm thick; rare; SOLD


Roman, Imperial Cone Shaped Lead Bulla Seal, 4th Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The portrait appears to be that of Constantine the Great. Interesting.
AS38022. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF, weight 16.211 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, obverse laureate and draped bust right; SOLD


Late Roman or Byzantine Lead Token, c. 5th - 11th Century

Click for a larger photo
The legend on this piece, H XAPIC EIMI, translates literally to "I am a grace." In this context, XAPIC (grace) should probably be translated as a favor, thanks, or an offering.
BZ53321. Lead token, VF, weight 10.618 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, obverse H XA/PIC EI/MI, retrograde inscription in three lines; a very interesting and large piece!; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Kemales Tzotzikes, Protospatharios, Hypatos and Strategos of Artach, c. 1000 - 1150

Click for a larger photo
The name Kermales was common among the Turks. The family name Tzotzikios, however, clearly indicates this general was Georgian. His name is also found among the founders of monastery of Iviron. Georgians played a significant role in the service of the empire and Artach (modern Irtah, 40 KM east of Antioch) was an important fortress on the eastern frontier captured by the Byzantines in 966, facing the emirate of Aleppo.
BZ49868. Lead bulla (tag seal), cf. Zacos III 262 (larger, 22.88g), broken in two, weight 10.092 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, obverse [O AΓIOΣ ΘEO∆ΩPOΣ], St Theodoros standing facing in military dress, spear in right, left rests on grounded shield; reverse +KEM/AΛHC ACΠ/ΘAP VΠATO/Σ CTPATIΓ / TOu APTAX/O TZOTZI/KIC (in 7 lines); SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Maurice Tiberius, 13 August 582 - 22 November 602 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
BZ49855. Lead decanummium, Morrisson, "Monnaies en plomb byzantines" in RIN LXXXIII (1981), 6; copying the bronze decanummi of Ravenna (cf. SBCV 601), F, weight 3.374 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 45o, uncertain mint, obverse helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, flanked by crosses; reverse large I (10 nummi) between two crosses; provincial emergency issue; scarce; SOLD


Byzantine, Lead Bulla Seal, 7th - 11th Century

Click for a larger photo
During the late Roman and Byzantine periods, lead bullae (singular, Bulla) were widely used to seal and identify the sender of correspondence and containers in shipment. An iron, pliers-shaped instrument, a boulloterion, was used to impress the designs on a lead bulla seal. After the cord was wrapped around the package or document and the ends inserted in a channel in the blank seal, the seal was placed between the disk shaped engraved dies on the jaws of a boulloterion. The boulloterion had a projection above the jaws, which was struck with a hammer to impress the design on the seal and close the channel around the two ends of the cord. With a bulla in place a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, ensuring the contents remain tamper-proof until they reach their destination.
AS34517. Fine, weight 6.493 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, obverse nimbate saint with cross in left; reverse cruciform monogram; SOLD


Byzantine, Lead Cone-Shaped Bulla Seal, c. 6th - 7th Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
A bulla (plural, bullae), is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, thereby ensuring the contents remain tamper-proof until they reach their destination.
AS35600. Byzantine lead cone-shaped bulla seal; 14.1 g, 19.9 mm long, obverse draped bust right; reverse cruciform monogram; SOLD


Lot of Two Lead Seals

Click for a larger photo
BZ39328. Lead seal, Two lead seals, one Byzantine with Greek legend (16 x 15 mm), the other with a decorative pattern (24 mm diameter, perhaps Islamic), F, SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Lead Bulla Seal, c. 5th - 12th Century

Click for a larger photo
During the Byzantine period, lead bullae (singular, Bulla) were widely used to seal and identify the sender of correspondence and containers in shipment. An iron, pliers-shaped instrument, a boulloterion, was used to impress the designs on a lead bulla seal. After the cord was wrapped around the package or document and the ends inserted in a channel in the blank seal, the seal was placed between the disk shaped engraved dies on the jaws of a boulloterion. The boulloterion had a projection above the jaws, which was struck with a hammer to impress the design on the seal and close the channel around the two ends of the cord. With a bulla in place a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, ensuring the contents remain tamper-proof until they reach their destination.
BB53492. Lead bulla (tag seal), very large, weight 40.994 g, maximum diameter 39.7 mm, SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Lead Bulla Seal, c. 10th - 11th Century

Click for a larger photo
A Bulla (plural, Bullae), is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, thereby ensuring the contents remain tamper-proof until they reach their destination.
BB53368. Lead bulla (tag seal), weight 5.824 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, obverse MR - ΘV (Mother of God), bust of the Virgin facing; reverse Greek inscription; ex Alex G. Malloy; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



REFERENCES|

Jordanov, I. Corpus of Byzantine Seals from Bulgaria. (Sofia, 2003).
Jordanov, I & Z. Zhekova. Catalogue of Medieval Seals at the Regional Historical Museum of Shumen. (Sofia, 2007).
Metcalf, D.M. Byzantine Lead Seals from Cyprus. (Nicosia, 2004).
Morrisson, C. "Monnaies en plomb byzantines" in RIN LXXXIII (1981).
Nesbitt, J. et al., eds. Catalogue of Byzantine Seals at Dumbarton Oaks and the Fogg Museum of Art. (Washington, DC. 1991-2005).
Spink. Byzantine Seals from the Collection of George Zacos, Part I. Auction 127 (7 October 1998). London.
Spink. Byzantine Seals from the Collection of George Zacos, Part II. Auction 132 (25 May 1999). London.
Spink. Byzantine Seals from the Collection of George Zacos, Part III. Auction 135 (6 October 1999). London.
Youroukova P. & V. Penchev. Bulgarian Medieval Coins and Seals. (Sofia, 1990).
Zacos, G. Byzantine Lead Seals. (Berne, 1972-84).

Catalog current as of Thursday, August 22, 2019.
Page created in 1.117 seconds.
Byzantine Seals