Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 3 SEPTEMBER Layaway and reserve are not available during the sale Shop NOW and save! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 3 SEPTEMBER Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958 Shop NOW and save!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Cupid or Eros||View Options:  |  |  | 

Cupid or Eros

Cupid to the Romans, Eros to the Greeks, is the god of desire, affection and erotic love. He is the son of goddess Venus and god Mars. In popular culture, Cupid is frequently shown shooting his bow to inspire romantic love, often as an icon of Valentine's Day. Today he is the personification of love and courtship in general.


Amisos, Pontos, c. 120 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
A natural fortress and harbor on the south coast of the Black Sea in the former land of the Chalybes, Pharnakia stood at the end of a route over the Pontic mountains from Armenia Minor. Pharnakes I of Pontus founded it, c. 180 B.C., in newly conquered territory with citizens from Kotyora. The city was annexed to Galatia with the rest of the Pontic Kingdom in 64 or 65 A.D.
GB87633. Bronze AE 16, SNG BM Black Sea 1142, SNG Stancomb 672, SNGvA 71, HGC 7 250 (R1), EF, dark green patina, light marks, weight 4.165 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, time of Mithradates VI Eupator; obverse bust of Eros right; reverse AMI−ΣOY, quiver and unstrung bow; rare; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


Carteia, Hispania Baetica, c. 44 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Latin colony of Carteia was founded in 171 B.C. In 27 B.C., when Augustus had become emperor, Hispania Ulterior was divided into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-Len). Cantabria and Basque country were also added to Hispania Citerior.
GB89171. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2609, Villaronga 65; RPC I 116, SNG Cop 434, SNG Lorichs 1337, SNG Mnchen -, SNG Tub, aF/VF, dark patina, tight flan, marks, porosity, reverse slightly off center, weight 4.885 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 270o, Carteia (near San Roque, Spain) mint, c. 44 B.C. - 1st century A.D.; obverse CARTEIA, head of Fortuna-Tyche right, wearing crown of turreted city walls, trident behind; reverse Cupid riding dolphin right, IIII VIR above, EX D D below; ex CNG e-auction 379 (27 Jul 2016), lot 655 (part of, noted as ex RBW); $55.00 SALE |PRICE| $49.50


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Felix (Lucky) was a traditional epithet for Venus. Venus Felix was her cult title at Hadrian's temple to Venus Felix and Roma Aeterna on the Via Sacra. In dice-games, a popular pastime among Romans of all classes, the luckiest, best possible roll was known as "Venus."
RS91458. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 898c, RIC V-1 J7 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 115 (Lugdunum), Hunter IV J24, Eauze 1513, Cunetio 733 (20 spec.), Elmer 60, SRCV III 10655, VF, well centered, old cabinet toning, flow lines, struck with worn dies, weight 3.934 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 257 - 259 A.D.; obverse SALONINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head, crescent behind shoulders; reverse VENVS FELIX (Venus who brings good fortune), Venus seated left, extending right hand reaching for child (or Cupid) standing at her feet with arms raised to her, transverse scepter in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Greek mythology, Eros was the Greek god of love. His Roman counterpart was Cupid ("desire"). According to Hesiod (c. 700 B.C.), one of the most ancient of all Greek sources, Eros was the fourth god to come into existence, coming after Chaos, Gaia (the Earth), and Tartarus (the Abyss or the Underworld). Parmenides (c. 400 B.C.), one of the pre-Socratic philosophers, makes Eros the first of all the gods to come into existence. In early Greek poetry and art, Eros was depicted as an adult male who embodies sexual power. But in later sources, Eros is represented as the son of Aphrodite, whose mischievous interventions in the affairs of gods and mortals cause bonds of love to form, often illicitly. Ultimately, by the later satirical poets, he is represented as a child, the precursor to the chubby Renaissance Cupid.
GY91911. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber II 2388(8) (otherwise unpublished, 7 specimens cited from private collections), aVF, mottled garnet and black patina, marks, some porosity, beveled obverse edge, weight 5.785 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain probably Phoenician mint, c. 113 - 100 B.C.; obverse winged bust of Eros right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY on right, ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ on left, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY in two downward lines on right, ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ in downward line on left, monogram outer left (control), B and symbol (controls) in exergue; $32.00 SALE |PRICE| $28.80







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Saturday, August 24, 2019.
Page created in 0.783 seconds.
Cupid or Eros