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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros||View Options:  |  |  |   


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 200 - 133 B.C.

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Ex William Turner Collection. William Turner (1792 - 1867), British diplomat of the early 19th century, authored his interesting and opinionated Journal of a Tour in Levante (1820) describing his adventures in the area. This specimen was obtained by Turner in the course of his travels (1812 - 1817).

III:282 "..this morning I bought a few medals of the city [Pergamum] for which I could not close my bargain last night, but I was right in supposing that if I remained firm, the seller would yield on seeing me go off."
WT46627. Bronze AE 22, William Turner Collection 372 (this coin); SNG BnF 1866; SNG Cop 379; BMC Mysia p. 128, 149; Weber 5188; SGCV II 3976, F, weight 7.891 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 133 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Asklepios right, ΣEΛEYKOY below; reverse Π−EP/Γ−A/MHNΩN, eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Philippopolis, Thrace

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Nomos described this coin as, "An extraordinary piece, especially with remains of its original silver plating. Some marks from cleaning, otherwise, about extremely fine."
SH85458. Bronze medallion, okatassarion or quinarius; SNG Cop 784; Varbanov III 1721 (R8); Mionnet I, p. 419, 358 (R6); Mouchmov 5428 (all same dies), aEF, cleaning marks, areas of light corrosion, weight 38.718 g, maximum diameter 40.8 mm, die axis 15o, Philippopolis mint, 218 - 222 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYPΛ ANTΩNEINOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed three-quarter length bust of Elagabalus left; reverse MHTPOΠOΛEΩC ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛEΩC NEΩ KOPOY, youthful Herakles standing left, nude but for lion's skin draped around his left forearm, resting his right hand on the handle of a club set on the ground and holding an apple in his left hand; big 40.8mm bronze!, ex Nomos AG, auction 10 (18 May 2015), lot 115 (realized approximately $4686 including buyers fee); extremely rare; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck after Alexander's death, under either Perdikkas or Antipater, regents during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule. Both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered to ensure the succession of her grandson. But Alexander IV would never rule. In 311 B.C., he and his mother Roxana were executed by the regent Kassander.
SH86161. Silver tetradrachm, Price 113, MŁller Alexander 224, Troxell issue H3, SNG Cop 682, SNG MŁnchen 275, SNG Alpha Bank 503, SNG Delepierre 986, Choice EF, attractive archaic style, bold well centered strike, high relief, light toning, weight 17.283 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 322 - 320 A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus AŽtophoros seated left on throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Macedonian helmet (control symbol) left; Classical Numismatic Group auction 105 (10 May 2017), lot 78; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 46 (11 Sep 2016), lot 105 (realized Ä1,900 plus fees); SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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A gilded 2nd century B.C. slightly over-lifesize bronze statue, Hercules of the Forum Boarium, has Hercules in a similar pose. This statue is probably the one mentioned by Pliny, which originally stood in the Temple of Hercules Victor, by the Tiber. It lacks the lion skin. Perhaps a actual lion skin was once draped on it. The sculpture is now in the Musei Capitolini, Rome. Another similar sculpture, from the 2nd Century A.D., the Hercules of the Theatre of Pompey, was discovered in 1864, carefully buried under protective tiles. It was incised FCS (fulgor conditum summanium), indicating that it had been struck by lightning, and had been carefully interred on the spot. The figure lightly supports himself on his grounded vertical club, the skin of the Nemean Lion is draped over his left forearm. This sculpture is now in the round room area of Museo Pio-Clementino, in the Vatican.Hercules_Sculptures
SH32111. Gold aureus, Woytek 72b, RIC II 37, Caliců 1053a, BMCRE III 58 var. (aegis), BnF 75 var. (no drapery), Cohen 215 var. (same), SRCV II 3095 var. (same), VF, scrape on cheek, scratches, weight 7.347 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, Jan/Feb 100 - Oct 100 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate bust right, hint of drapery on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III P P, statue of Hercules standing facing on low base, nude except for lion skin draped over shoulders and left arm, club downward in right hand, apples of Hesperides in his left hand; SOLD


Herakleia Pontika, Bithynia, Tyrants Timotheus and Dionysios, 345 - 337 B.C.

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SH26918. Silver stater, BMC Pontus p. 142, 22, Dewing 2151, EF, weight 9.705 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Herakleia Pontika mint, 345 - 337 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wreathed with ivy, thyrsos behind; reverse TIMOΘEOY ∆IONYΣIOY, Herakles standing left, wearing lion-skin over left arm and sword in sheath, attaching spear and shield to a trophy of captured arms; ex E. J. Waddell, superb specimen; SOLD


Selge, Pisidia, c. 300 - 190 B.C.

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A scarce type inspired by the well known "athletic" issue of Aspendos.
SH28066. Silver stater, SNG BnF 1936, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Lycia -, EF, minor flan defects on rev, weight 10.747 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 300 - 190 B.C.; obverse two wrestlers, the left one grabs the wrist and forearm of his opponent, AΛI between their legs; reverse ΣEΛΓEΩN on left, Herakles standing half-left, head turned right, club in raised right, lion-skin in left, O between legs; SOLD


Pompey the Great, Proconsul, Murdered in 48 B.C., Minted by his son Sextus Pompey

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Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.). He was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.
SH85112. Silver denarius, Crawford 511/3a, RSC I Pompey the Great 17, Sydenham 1344, BMCRR Sicily 7, Cohen Pompey the Great 18, Sear CRI 344, SRCV I 1392, VF, light toning, luster in recesses, tight flan, die wear, part of edge ragged, weight 3.908 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Sicilian mint, 42 - 40 B.C.; obverse MAG PIVS IMP ITER, head of Pompey the Great right, between capis and lituus (augural symbols); reverse Neptune standing left, right foot on prow, nude but for chlamys on left arm, holding apluster, flanked by the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, running in opposite directions with their parents on their shoulders, PRAEF above, CLAS ET ORAE / MARIT EX S C in two lines in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 201 - 190 B.C., Civic Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great

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Signed obverse die. The letters on the lower lip of the lion's mouth have been identified to read ∆AN, believed to be the signature of a Rhodian master die engraver. ∆AN likely abbreviates Danaos a name common at Rhodos, and the name of the mythical founder of the city. The monogram on the reverse likely names the magistrate responsible for the mint, possibly named Ainetor.
SH84141. Silver tetradrachm, Kleiner Alexander series IV, pl. XXVII, H-21 (same dies), SNG Berry 320 (same), SNG Cop 761, Mektepini 439, McClean 3472, Price 2514, EF, double strike, areas of corrosion, weight 17.162 g, maximum diameter 31.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 201 - c. 190 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck, ∆AN (or similar) on the lion's lower jaw; reverse Zeus seated left on throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AINHTWR(?) monogram over rose left, PO (Rhodos) under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; ex Harlan J. Berk, sale 199, lot 53; very rare; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Click the photo to see the larger photo, then...check out Zeus' toes!
SH86207. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3107, MŁller Alexander 1294, SNG Ashmolean 2914, EF, bold well centered strike, tight flan cutting off part of reverse inscription, light deposits,, weight 17.108 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Citium mint, possible lifetime issue, c. 325 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus AŽtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, TK monogram left, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) below; SOLD


Carthaginians in Sicily, 325 - 300 B.C.

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In 311 B.C., Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse, invaded the Carthaginian holdings on Sicily and laid siege to Akragas. Hamilcar led the Carthaginian response, and by 310 controlled almost all of Sicily and laid siege to Syracuse itself. In desperation, Agathocles secretly led an expedition of 14,000 men to Africa, hoping to save his rule by leading a counterstrike against Carthage itself. Carthage was forced to recall Hamilcar and most of his army from Sicily. Agathocles was eventually defeated in 307 B.C., but he escaped back to Sicily and negotiated a peace which maintained Syracuse as a stronghold of Greek power in Sicily.
SH12231. Silver tetradrachm, SGCV II 6436, SNG Cop 983, EF, weight 17.096 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse head of young Herakles clad in lion's skin; reverse horse's head, l.; palm tree behind, Punic legend AMHMHNTE (people of the camp) below; beautiful coin; SOLD




  




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