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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |Syria||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of Syria

Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Bohemond III, 1163 - 1201

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Cover Coin - book cover coin for Malloy, Preston and Seltman's Coins of the Crusader States.

From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years. Ex A.J. |Seltman| Collection.

crusader book
SH45453. Billon denier, Malloy Crusaders 53b (book cover coin), Choice EF, weight 0.994 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 135o, obverse + BOAMVNDVS, elongated bearded head right wearing helmet and chain-mail, crescent left, star right, A ornamented with pellets; reverse + AMTIOCNIA (sic), cross pattée, crescent in upper right angle, A's ornamented with pellets; buyer will receive a free copy of Coins of the Crusader States signed by Alex Malloy; scarce; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

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This is the line drawing coin in Malloy, Preston and Seltman's Coins of the Crusader States.

From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, it was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

Historically of great importance, this coin was minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

CR31585. Bronze AE 15, Malloy Crusaders 132 (this coin), VF, weight 0.986 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 225o, obverse A/N-T/I clockwise in the angles of a long cross pattée; reverse ANTI counterclockwise in the angles of a long cross pattée; extremely rare; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years and co-author of Coins of the Crusader States. See Malloy Crusaders p. 197 for a discussion of the late anonymous series.

Old tag notes, "The Hague, Holland Viken Havandjian, Jan. 22, 1976, $65.00"

Ex John J. Slocum Collection. Mr. Slocum was in the American diplomatic service in the Holy Land where he collected rare and unique coins in the early 1960's.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, it was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

FORVM has three examples of this type (one a variant without the T) from the Malloy Collection. No other examples are known and the type is otherwise unknown to modern numismatics. Historically of great importance, these coins were minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

SH32267. Bronze pougeoise, unpublished and historically important, the finest of three known to exist, Malloy Crusaders -, Metcalf Crusades -, aVF, octagonal shaped flan, weight 0.646 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, obverse hexagram, ANT (Antioch) monogram in center (T is small and above H); reverse hexagram, ΠP monogram in center (uncertain meaning, perhaps the moneyers name or the ruling Crusaders at this time but interestingly in Greek not Latin); of great rarity; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years and co-author of Coins of the Crusader States. See Malloy Crusaders p. 197 for a discussion of the late anonymous series.

Ex John J. Slocum Collection. Mr. Slocum was in the American diplomatic service in the Holy Land where he collected rare and unique coins in the early 1960's.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of about 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Afterward, lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding the letter with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

FORVM has three examples of this type (one a variant without the T) from the Malloy Collection. No other examples are known and the type is otherwise unknown to modern numismatics. Historically of great importance, these coins were minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

SH32083. Bronze pougeoise, unpublished and important, one of three known, Malloy Crusaders -, Metcalf Crusades -, VF, weight 0.672 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 270o, obverse hexagram, ANT (Antioch) monogram in center (T is small and above H); reverse hexagram, ΠP monogram in center (uncertain meaning, perhaps the moneyers name or the ruling Crusaders at this time but interestingly in Greek not Latin); of great rarity; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years and co-author of Coins of the Crusader States. See Malloy Crusaders p. 197 for a discussion of the late anonymous series.

Ex John J. Slocum Collection. Mr. Slocum was in the American diplomatic service in the Holy Land where he collected rare and unique coins in the early 1960's.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of about 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

FORVM has three examples of this type from the Malloy Collection. This particular coin is a unique variant. The other two examples have a small T above H, missing on this coin. No other examples are known and the type is otherwise unknown to modern numismatics. Historically of great importance, these coins were minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

SH32084. Bronze pougeoise, unpublished and historically important, unique variant of type with only three known, Malloy Crusaders -, Metcalf Crusades -, aVF, weight 0.774 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 45o, obverse hexagram, AN (Antioch) monogram in center; reverse hexagram, ΠP monogram in center (uncertain meaning, perhaps the moneyers name or the ruling Crusaders at this time but interestingly in Greek not Latin); of great rarity; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Bohemond III, 1163 - 1201

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This is the line drawing coin in Malloy, Preston and Seltman's Coins of the Crusader States.

From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years. Ex Spink and Son. Ex R. Pesant Collection.
SH31535. Bronze pougeoise, Malloy Crusaders 71a (this coin), VF, edge chip, weight 0.729 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Majority, early period, 1163 - 1188; obverse + BOAMVNDVS, fleur-de-lis with splayed foot, pellet in each angle; reverse + ANTIOCHIA, cross pattée, five pointed star in each angle, fine beaded border; rare, Very Fine examples of this type are extremely difficult to obtain; SOLD


Sasanian Empire, Levantine Occupation, 610 - 629 A.D., Imitative of Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine

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In 604, Khusro II personnally led the siege of Dara, Mesopotamia. Because they resisted, the inhabitants were slaughtered and everything of value was carried off to Persia. This warning was somewhat sufficient; other cities including Antioch (610), Emesa (611), and Damascus (613) surrendered under terms and opened their gates. When Jerusalem was taken in May 614, tens of thousands were massacred and the True cross was taken. In 619 when Alexandria surrendered after a long siege, the young men and monks were massacred. Evidence suggests, however, that Persians allowed the local adminstrations to resume control of these cities after the initial slaughter and looting. This type was likely struck by civic authorities for local use in one of the Levantine cities during the Sasanian Occupation.
BZ65350. Bronze follis, Imitative of Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine; Pottier p. 140, 4, pl. XVI, AA3-4; CNG e-auction 217, 461, aVF, crude barbaric style, weight 13.560 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 135o, 610 - 629 A.D.; obverse NOCVΛ-PTCNC (or similar, blundered), two imperial figures standing facing in very crude style, each holding cruciform scepter in right, cross above center; reverse large M (40 nummi), ANN left, G/II right, ONIX in exergue (all N's reversed); unusual and rare; SOLD


Sasanian Empire, Levantine Occupation, 610 - 629 A.D., Imitative of Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine

Click for a larger photo
In 604, Khusro II personnally led the siege of Dara, Mesopotamia. Because they resisted, the inhabitants were slaughtered and everything of value was carried off to Persia. This warning was somewhat sufficient; other cities including Antioch (610), Emesa (611), and Damascus (613) surrendered under terms and opened their gates. When Jerusalem was taken in May 614, tens of thousands were massacred and the True cross was taken. In 619 when Alexandria surrendered after a long siege, the young men and monks were massacred. Evidence suggests, however, that Persians allowed the local adminstrations to resume control of these cities after the initial slaughter and looting. This type was likely struck by civic authorities for local use in one of the Levantine cities during the Sasanian Occupation.
BZ65330. Bronze follis, Imitative of Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine; CNG e-auction 217, 460 (same obverse die); cf. Pottier p. 140, 4, pl. XVII, Pottier AA3-6, VF, nice desert patina, weight 11.641 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 315o, 610 - 629 A.D.; obverse two imperial figures standing facing in very crude style, each holding cruciform scepter in right, cross above center; reverse large M (40 nummi), cross above, A below, blundered legend and mintmark; unusual and rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

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Antiochus' victory at the Battle of Panium in 198 B.C. transferred control of Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt to the Seleukid Kingdom. When Antiochos conquered Asia Minor, however, the Romans responded. Antiochos' losses were so great that the whole of his empire was shattered and he was forced to content himself with the region that he had held in the beginning, Syria.
SL74043. Bronze AE 26, Houghton-Lorber I 1256, Newell ESM 611, SNG Spaer 795, HGC 9 482 (R2), NGC VG, strike 4/5, surface 3/5, (4161256-003), weight 13.00 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, Ekbatana mint, c. 205 A.D.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Nike walking left, wreath in extended right hand, long palm in left, ∆Ϙ monogram over horse head left in inner left field, TBΛ monogram inner right; ex Tom Cederlind; rare; SOLD


Normans, Kingdom of Sicily, William II, 1166 - 1189 A.D.

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This countermark is reputedly found in the middle east and may indicate a revaluation to 3 falus.
ME65246. Bronze 3 follaro, MEC Italy III 425 ff., Travaini 166 ff., Biaggi 1231, F, countermark: VF, weight 10.614 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Messina mint, second copper coinage; obverse facing lion head mask, countermark: three pellets in rectangular punch; reverse palm tree with dates; SOLD




  




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Syrian Coins