Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Crustacean||View Options:  |  |  |   

Crabs, Lobsters, Crayfish, and Shrimp on Ancient Coins

Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Some numismatists have attributed this type to the Carian Island of Cos, due to the striking similarities to the archaic silver coinage of that island. Although this attribution is possible, most of the numismatic community accepts this type as Ionian in origin.
SH77551. Electrum hekte, Unpublished in standard refs but about a dozen known from sales, cf. Rosen 346 - 347 (Anatolia, uncertain city, 1/96 Phocaic stater), VF, dark spots, weight 2.612 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, Phocaic standard; obverse crab seen from above; reverse quadripartite incuse square; very rare; SOLD


Akragas, Sicily, c. 510 - 472 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GS21673. Silver didrachm, SNG ANS 950, gVF, weight 8.614 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 270o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 510 - 472 B.C.; obverse AK/RA, eagle standing right, wings closed; reverse crab viewed from above, within deep round incuse; SOLD


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Some numismatists have attributed this type to the Carian Island of Cos, due to the striking similarities to the archaic silver coinage of that island. Although this attribution is possible, most of the numismatic community accepts this type as Ionian in origin.
SH57788. Electrum hekte, Unpublished in standard refs but about a dozen known from sales, cf. Rosen 346 - 347 (Anatolia (uncertain city), 1/96 Phocaic stater), gVF, weight 2.757 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, Phocaic standard; obverse crab; reverse quadripartite incuse; ex N.Y.I.N.C. auction 163, lot 262; well centered, nice strike; very rare; SOLD


Akragas, Sicily, c. 495 - 482 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
SH28721. Silver didrachm, SNG ANS 939, gVF, weight 8.833 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 90o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 495 - 482 B.C.; obverse AKPA, eagle standing left; reverse crab in incuse convex round; SOLD


Akragas, Sicily, c. 420 - 406 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
On similar common types, the eagle is right, sometimes devouring the fish, and on the reverse the positions of octopus and conch are switched. This particular type with the eagle screaming left and the octopus to the left the conch is missing from all the references examined (Calciati, HGC 2, SNG ANS, SNG Cop, SNG Munchen, SNG Tubingen, SNG Lloyd, BMC Sicily, McClean, Weber, et al.). This coin is the only example on Coin Archives (the Savoca auction).
GB86317. Bronze hemilitron, apparently unpublished; Calciati 47 var. (conch to left); HGC 2 135 (R1) corr. (same obv. die but text says eagle right) var. (conch to left), VF, well centered, some porosity, reverse slightly rough, weight 21.219 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 90o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 406 B.C.; obverse AKP-AΓANTIN-ON, eagle standing left on fish, raising head up screaming, wings open; reverse crab from above, eel in right claw, octopus to left of conch shell below, six pellets around; ex Savoca Numismatik, auction 4 (30 Aug 2015), lot 176; extremely rare variety; SOLD


Akragas, Sicily, c. 510 - 500 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GS79796. Silver didrachm, Jenkins Id; cf. HGC 2 90 (R2); SNG ANS 918; SNG Cop 28; BMC Sicily p. 6, 9 (tetradrachm), VF, attractive style, tight flan, die wear, light marks and porosity, weight 8.559 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 315o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 495 - 482 B.C.; obverse AKPAXA/NTOΣ (counterclockwise from lower right, letters retrograde), sea eagle standing left, wings closed; reverse crab; rare; SOLD


Brettian League, Bruttium, Italy, c. 211- 208 B.C., Time of Hannibal

Click for a larger photo
The success of Hannibal at Cannae proved too much for the Bruttians' fidelity; they were among the first after the battle to declare in favor of the Carthaginian general. Some towns at first remained with Rome, but Petelia and Consentia were speedily reduced by other Bruttians and a small Carthaginian force, and the more important cities of Locri and Crotona followed not long after. Rhegium alone remained firm, and was able to defy Carthage throughout the war. The region became a Carthaginian stronghold, but the Romans, though avoiding any decisive engagement, continually gained ground by the successive reduction of towns and fortresses. The ravages of war were a severe blow to Bruttium. Punishment by the Romans after the war completed their humiliation. They were deprived of most of their territory, and the whole nation was reduced to near servitude. A praetor with an army was sent annually to watch over them. Colonies were established at Tempsa, Crotona, and Hipponium (renamed Vibo Valentia). A fourth was settled at Thurii on their frontier. From this time the Bruttians as a people disappear from history. All coinage of the Brettii was issued while they were allied with Hannibal.
SH72544. Bronze quarter unit, SNG ANS 120 - 122; Scheu Bronze 50; HN Italy 1990; BMC Italy p. 332, 106 var. (no controls), Choice gVF, attractive green patina, weight 1.755 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 180o, Bruttium mint, 211- 208; obverse head of a sea goddess (Amphitrite or Thetis) left, with crab headdress, fulmen (thunderbolt) below neck; reverse BRET/TIΩN, crab, bunch of grapes (control symbol) above between claws, linear border; rare; SOLD


Akragas, Sicily, 472 - 420 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Akragas is Agrigento today.
SH06253. Silver tetradrachm, SGCV I 741, F, weight 16.74 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, 472 - 420 A.D.; obverse AKPACANTOΣ, eagle with closed wings standing left; reverse crab; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonian Double Shekel

Click for a larger photo
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
SH10743. Silver double shekel, Houghton 88.4, Newell ESM 268, VF, weight 15.91 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 270o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 311 - after 305 B.C.; obverse Ba'al enthroned left, scepter in right, resting left on seat, pellet under throne, border of dots; reverse lion walking left on exergual line, horizontal anchor flukes left above, craB in exergue, border of dots; partial flat strike; SOLD


Massalia, Gaul, c. 475 - 460 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
GA79812. Silver obol, Chevillon OBM-1 (fig. 29); Brenot Period 2, 1; Furtwšngler Massalia, Em. VI, pl. III, 4; De La Tour 511; SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, nice metal, weight 0.889 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 0o, Massalia mint, 475 - 465/460 B.C.; obverse archaic head of Apollo left; reverse crab, M below; Ex CNG e-auction 368 (10 Feb 2016), lot 4; ex Poindessault-Vedrines (31 March 1997), lot 339.; very rare; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.




Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 12, 2019.
Page created in 2.61 seconds.
Crustaceans