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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Griffin||View Options:  |  |  |   

Griffins on Ancient Coins

The griffin, griffon, or gryphon is a legendary creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. As the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle was the king of the birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature. Griffins are normally known for guarding treasure and well valued priceless possession.


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Lifetime issue!
SH33207. Gold stater, Price 2533, MŁller Alexander 293, VF, weight 8.496 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, griffin head left; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Alexander the Great lifetime issue, struck by his Satrap in Lydia, Menander. Menander, the commander of a force of mercenaries in Alexander's army, was appointed by Alexander as the satrap in Lydia in 331. In 323 B.C., he was commissioned to conduct a reinforcement of troops to Alexander at Babylon, where he arrived there just before Alexander's death. In the division of the provinces after the death of Alexander, Menander received his former government of Lydia. He appears soon to have attached himself to the party of Antigonus. In the new distribution of the provinces at Triparadisus in 321 B.C., he lost the government of Lydia, which was given to Cleitus; but this was probably a promotion by Antigonus, as he commanded part of Antigonus' army in the first campaign against Eumenes in 320 B.C. The following year, Menander learned of the escape of Eumenes from Nora, and advanced with an army into Cappadocia to attack him, forcing him to take refuge in Cilicia. After this, no further mention of Menander is found in history.
SH68249. Gold stater, Price 2533, MŁller Alexander 293, gVF, weight 8.547 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, struck by Menander, c. 330 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, griffin head left; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 216, lot 2269; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH08281. Gold stater, Price 193, VF, weight 8.47 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 225o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with a griffin; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Nike standing left holding wreath and ship's mast, monogram at feet left, wheel in left field; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Lifetime issue!
SH32293. Gold stater, Price 2533, MŁller Alexander 293, VF, damaged obverse die, weight 8.605 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right, stylus in left, griffin head to left; scarce; SOLD


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 152 - 151 B.C., New Style Silver Tetradrachm

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In 1961, Margaret Thompson completed her brilliant study, "The New Style Coinage of Athens." At that time, she estimated there were fewer than 8000 new style tetradrachms "above ground."

This issue introduced the letter on the amphora, which that may indicate the month of production.
SH26244. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson Athens 82 (same dies); Svoronos Athens pl. 35, 21 (same obv. die); BMC Attica -; SNG Cop -; SNG Britain -, Weber -; ANS -; et al. -, gVF, nice style, weight 16.641 g, maximum diameter 33.9 mm, die axis 0o, early period; obverse head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing crested helmet ornamented with a griffin; reverse A−ΘE, owl stands right on amphora, XM monogram left, AΦN monogram over two snakes right, I on amphora, all within olive wreath; nice style; rare; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Orthosia, Phoenicia

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This is an extremely rare issue known only from a few specimens.
SH03585. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 4502, SNG Cop 176, aF, weight 6.68 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, Phoenicia, Orthosia mint, 35 - 34 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Cleopatra right, star behind; reverse Baal of Orthosia in chariot pulled by to griffins to right, LΓ (Phoenician regnal year 3) in left field, OPΘΩCIEΩN in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Teos, Ionia, c. 412 - 407 B.C.

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Teos was a flourishing seaport until about 540 B.C., when the Persian emperor Cyrus the Great invaded Lydia and Ionia. The town survived but most of the citizens fled to the newly founded colonies of Abdera and Phanagoria. Under the Roman Empire, the town was noted for its wine, a theater and its Temple of Dionysus. The site is now farmland.
SH32531. Silver stater, Balcer A133/P188; BMC Ionia p. 312, 20 = Traitť II 1944 (same dies), VF, weight 11.756 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, Teos (near Sigacik, Turkey) mint, obverse THION, griffin seated right, left fore-paw raised, bee above; reverse quadripartite incuse square, striated alternately; some flatly struck areas, mottled toning; SOLD


Teos, Ionia, c. 495 - 478 B.C.

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Teos was a flourishing seaport until about 540 B.C., when the Persian emperor Cyrus the Great invaded Lydia and Ionia. The town survived but most of the citizens fled to the newly founded colonies of Abdera and Phanagoria. Under the Roman Empire, the town was noted for its wine, a theater and its Temple of Dionysus. The site is now farmland.
SH32665. Silver stater, Balcer A25/P44; BMC Ionia p. 309, 2; Traitť I 499 (all same dies), EF, weight 11.595 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, Teos (near Sigacik, Turkey) mint, c. 495 - 478 B.C.; obverse griffin seated right, both fore-paws on ground; reverse quadripartite incuse square; very high relief, mottled toning; SOLD


Metapontion, Lucania, Italy, c. 330 - 290 B.C.

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Demeter in Greek mythology is the goddess of grain and fertility, the pure; nourisher of the youth and the green earth, the health-giving cycle of life and death; and preserver of marriage and the sacred law. In the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, dated to about the seventh century B.C. she is invoked as the "bringer of seasons," a subtle sign that she was worshiped long before she was made one of the Olympians. She and her daughter Persephone were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries that also predated the Olympian pantheon.
SH66239. Silver nomos, Johnston C6; BMC Italy p. 252, 108; SNG ANS 489; SNG MŁnchen 977; SNG Lockett 421; SNG Fitzwilliam 509; SNG Oxford 760; HN Italy 1589,, VF, weight 7.524 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 270o, Metapontion (Metaponto, Italy) mint, c. 330 - 290 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter left, wreathed in grain; reverse barley ear with seven rows of grains, leaf on left, griffin springing right above leaf, ΛY below leaf, META on right; SOLD


Teos, Ionia, c. 510 - 475 B.C.

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Teos was a flourishing seaport until about 540 B.C., when the Persian emperor Cyrus the Great invaded Lydia and Ionia. The town survived but most of the citizens fled to the newly founded colonies of Abdera and Phanagoria. Under the Roman Empire, the town was noted for its wine, a theater and its Temple of Dionysus. The site is now farmland.
SH36164. Silver stater, Balcer group V, SNG Cop 1437, gVF, weight 11.747 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, Teos (near Sigacik, Turkey) mint, c. 510 - 475 B.C.; obverse griffin seated right, left forepaw raised, swan lower right; reverse quadripartite incuse square; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Monday, November 18, 2019.
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