Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Hanukkah Sameach! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ WolfView Options:  |  |  |   

Wolves on Ancient Coins

The she-wolf was the symbol of Rome from ancient times. The famous "lupa capitolina" suckled the legendary Romulus and Remus.


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The numeral on the obverse indicates Caesar's age when this coin was minted, a unique occurrence in Roman numismatics.
SH48922. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1400, BMCRR 3955, RSC I 18, Crawford 452/2, Sydenham 1009, Sear CRI 11, gVF, minor roughness, crack, weight 3.680 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Greek mint, 48 B.C.; obverse female head right, wearing oak wreath, necklace, jewel before ear, and cruciform earring, hair in jeweled knot behind with falling locks, LII (52) behind; reverse CAESAR at base of draped trophy of Gallic arms (shield decorated with fulmen, horned helmet and carnyx), axe topped by wolf head right; rainbow toned, struck by a military mint moving with Caesar, probably in Illyria; SOLD


Amisos, Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Amisos, the mythical home of the Amazons, was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire until it was captured by the Seljuks in 1200, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
SH73961. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 165; SNGvA 66; SNG BM 1218; SNG Stancomb 704; Rec Gen p. 56, 38; HGC 7 244; Laffaille -, VF, green patina, earthen encrustations, weight 7.574 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, Mithridatic War issue, 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Amazon right, wearing wolf scalp headdress; reverse Nike walking right, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left, AMI−ΣOY horizontal divided across field; scarce; SOLD


Roman Republic, P. Satrienus, 77 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The she-wolf, symbolic of Rome and depicted on this coin, is not directly connected to the she wolf that nursed Romulus and Remus. It was perhaps adopted as a symbol of Rome after the defeat of the rebel Italians who likened Rome to a predatory wolf. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
RR81808. Silver denarius, RSC I Satriena 1, Sydenham 781a, Crawford 388/1b, SRCV I 319, EF, weight 3.824 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 77 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Mars right, V (control number) behind; reverse she-wolf prowling right, ROMA above, P SATRIE/NVS in exergue; SOLD


Roman Republic, P. Satrienus, 77 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The she-wolf, symbolic of Rome and depicted on this coin, is not directly connected to the she wolf that nursed Romulus and Remus. It was perhaps adopted as a symbol of Rome after the defeat of the rebel Italians who likened Rome to a predatory wolf. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
RR66101. Silver denarius, BMCRR Rome 3208ff. (this control number not listed), RSC I Satriena 1, Sydenham 781a, Crawford 388/1b, SRCV I 319, VF, weight 3.917 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 77 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Mars right, ⊥XXXVIII (control number) behind; reverse she-wolf prowling right, right foreleg raised, ROMA above, P SATRIE/NVS in exergue; SOLD


Roman Republic, Sex. Pompeius Fostlus, c. 137 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants Romulus and Remus, being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned in the Tiber, was overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Lupa (she-wolf) was an ancient Latin slang term for prostitute. In some versions of the myth, Larentia was a prostitute.
RR58579. Silver denarius, SRCV I 112, RSC I Pompeia 1a, Sydenham 461, Crawford 235/1a, gVF, weight 3.711 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 137 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, X below chin, jug behind; reverse she-wolf right suckling Romulus and Remus, fig tree behind with three birds in the branches, the shepherd Faustulus standing right behind; FOSTLVS left, SEX PO on right ROMA in exergue; ex Sayles and Lavender; SOLD


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 215 - 150 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
During the Hellenic Era, the polis of Rhegion reached great artistic and cultural heights; it was home to art, philosophy and science academies, such as the Pythagorean School, and also to well-known poets, historians and sculptors such Ibycus, Ippy and Pythagoras of Rhegium.
GB66016. Bronze trias, SNG Cop 1986, SNG ANS 793, HN Italy 2562, Grose 1946, VF, edge flaw, overstruck as is typical for the type, weight 7.633 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rhegion mint, c. 215 - 150 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, long hair, palm frond behind, linear border; reverse PHΓI/NΩN, wolf about to spring right, III in right field, linear border; ex Olympus Coins Austin, TX; SOLD


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 465 - 430 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GS51922. Silver triobol, BCD Peloponnesos 1144, SNG Cop 40, BMC Peloponnesus p. 141, 64, gVF, weight 2.277 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 270o, Argos mint, c. 465 - 430 B.C.; obverse forepart of wolf right; reverse Z-EY, large A in a shallow rectangular incuse, eagle standing right on hetha below; SOLD


Argos, Argolis, Greece, Two Silver Coins Lot

Click for a larger photo
1. 90 - 50 B.C., BCD Peloponnesos 1169. On reverse, legend TPYΠIC and caps of Dioskouroi.

2. c. 500 - 470 B.C., BCD Peloponnesos 1004. Very rare.
GS38635. Silver Lot, 2 triobols, the larger from the 2nd - 1st Centuries B.C., the smaller from the 5th Century B.C., aVF, obverse forepart of wolf; reverse large A within incuse square; SOLD


Roman Republic, Sex. Pompeius Fostlus, c. 137 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants Romulus and Remus, being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned in the Tiber, was overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Lupa (she-wolf) was an ancient Latin slang term for prostitute. In some versions of the myth, Larentia was a prostitute.
SH63079. Silver denarius, SRCV I 112, RSC I Pompeia 1a, Sydenham 461, Crawford 235/1a, VF, toned, weight 3.766 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 137 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, X below chin, jug behind; reverse she-wolf right suckling Romulus and Remus, fig tree behind with three birds in the branches, the shepherd Faustulus standing right behind; FOSTLVS left, SEX PO on right ROMA in exergue; SOLD


City of Rome Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On some high grade examples of the VRBS ROMA series, a certain symbol can be seen or guessed on the shoulder of the wolf. It might look like the letter Θ (at Thessalonica and Alexandria) or a flock of hair, but on this well struck and preserved wolf there is an obvious star with rounded tips, different from the two above. There are no such symbols on earlier depictions (Republic and early empire) of the she-wolf as far as we know.
RL29336. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Rome 338, LRBC I 540, SRCV IV 16507, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V -, gVF, weight 2.622 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, RBQ in exergue; rare; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale price for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.




Catalog current as of Saturday, December 16, 2017.
Page created in 1.123 seconds.
Wolves