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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Persian Empire||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Persian Empire

The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire


Persian Empire, Sidon, Phoenicia, King Strato I (Adb'ashtart I), c. 365 - 352 B.C.

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SH48909. Silver double shekel, Elayi 2004 1345-8; cf. Betlyon 21 & 35; cf. BMC Phoenicia p. 145, 29, gVF, weight 25.428 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 352 B.C.; obverse armed galley with oars, advancing left, standard in stern, small figure as figurehead on bow, Phoenician regnal date year 14 (IIII-) above; reverse King of Persia with charioteer in a biga left, horses waking, Sidonian king walks behind in Asian garb carrying a cultic scepter and votive vase, Phoenician letters BA (90) above; typical weak strike, nicely centered on a full flan, lightly toned, ex Goldberg Auction 55, lot 77, 29 Oct 2009; SOLD


Persian Empire, Artaxerxes I - Darius III, c. 450 - 330 B.C., Lydia

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH30327. Gold daric, SGCV II 4679, Choice gVF, excellent style, weight 8.276 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned; reverse Oblong punch; American Numismatic Association Certifiction Service photo certificate of authenticity, dated 11-2-78; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes II - Artaxerxes II, c. 420 - 375 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH86216. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, group C (pl. XIV, 42); BMC Arabia pl. XXV, 12; SNG Cop 276; Meadows Administration 323; Sunrise 28, gVF, tight flan, marks, reverse struck with a worn broken punch, weight 8.328 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 420 - 375 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver on shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse oblong irregular rectangular incuse punch; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darios I to Xerxes II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH87857. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, Group A/B (pl. XIII, 27); Meadows, Administration 321; BMC Arabia pl. XXIV, 26; Sunrise 24; Lydo-Milesian standard, gVF, underlying luster, weight 8.309 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver on shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse oblong irregular rectangular incuse punch; ex CNG auction 109, lot 368; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darios I to Xerxes II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SL89829. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, Group A/B (pl. XIII, 27); Meadows Administration 321; BMC Arabia pl. XXIV, 26; Sunrise 24; Lydo-Milesian standard, NGC AU, strike 4/5, surface 4/5 (4252956-013), weight 8.36 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver on shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse oblong irregular rectangular incuse punch; SOLD


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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Mazaios was the Persian satrap of Cilicia beginning about 361 BC and in about 345 B.C. he was also made satrap of Transeuphratesia (which included Syria and Judaea). In 331 BC, Mazaios was defeated by Alexander the Great at the Battle of Gaugamela, after which he fled to Babylon. Later that year Mazaios surrendered Babylon, the capital of the Persian Empire, to Alexander. For surrendering without a fight, Alexander appointed Mazaios governor of Babylon. He died in 328 B.C.
GS38433. Silver stater, SNG Levante 103, SNG BnF 332, Casabonne 2D, Choice EF, excellent fully centered strike, weight 10.903 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361/360 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic (read upward) behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned half-left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, holding bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus tipped scepter vertical behind in left hand, Aramaic R lower left, Aramaic M below throne; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazaios) in Aramaic (read right to left) above; SOLD


Persian Empire, Gebal-Byblos, Phoenicia, King Azba'al, c. 400 - 376 B.C.

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In the Persian period (538 - 332 B.C.), Gebal was a vassal kingdom established by the Persians.

Byblos was famous for its papyrus - the word bible is derived from Byblos.
SH32538. Silver dishekel, SNG Cop 132, SGCV II 6011, Rouvier 639, Dewing 2662, attractive aEF, weight 13.187 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, Byblos (Jbail, Lebanon) mint, obverse galley left, lion-head prow, with three hoplites, each helmeted and holding shield, Phoenician monogram ayin zayin (AZ), hippocamp and murex below; reverse Phoenician legend, "Azbaal, king of Gebal", lion attacking bull; SOLD


Persian Empire, Mazakes, Satrap of Babylon and Egypt, c. 335 - 332 B.C.

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Mazakes was the Persian Satrap who surrendered Egypt to Alexander the Great. He was most likely Satrap in Babylon prior to his position in Egypt. After surrendering to Alexander, he was again Governor or an authority of some type in Babylon under the Satrap Mazaios, now working for Alexander. He may have actually been Satrap post Mazaios or at least worked together with Stamenes.

Mazakes issued Athenian type owls from both Mesopotamia and Egypt. Based on hoard evidence, most experts believe the types with thinner broader flans are from Memphis in Egypt, while those with thicker flans, more careless in execution, are from Babylon or Uruk. Most experts believe that Mazakes issued these coins in Babylon prior to 333 B.C., before his satrapy of Egypt. There is some possibility they were issued later while he governed under Alexander the Great, c. 325 - 315 B.C.
SH22453. Silver tetradrachm, Mitchiner IGIS vol 1, 12(a); Alram IP 378, VF, weight 16.603 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 270o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) or Uruk mint, c. 335 - 333 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse owl standing right, Aramaic inscription of Mazakes 'MaZDaKa' and monogram (possibly a fire altar symbol) to right; Ex Wayne Sayles, Ex Kovacs; rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Artaxerxes I - Darius III, c. 450 - 330 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH21693. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, group A, 27 (same reverse punch), SGCV II 4679, aEF, an excellent example of the type, weight 8.424 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 330 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned; reverse Oblong punch; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Artaxerxes I - Artaxerxes II, c. 450 - 375 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire
SH12096. Gold daric, Carradice Type IV A (pl. XIII, 32); BMC Arabia pl. XXVI 9; SGCV II 4680, EF, weight 8.297 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 375 B.C.; obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, dagger in right hand, bow in left hand; reverse oblong punch; rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Ashton, R., et al. "The Pixodarus Hoard" in Coin Hoards IX (2002).
Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Betlyon, J.W. The Coinage and Mints of Phoenicia. The Pre-Alexandrine Period. Harvard Semitic Monographs, Vol. 26. (Chico, CA, 1982).
Carradice, I. "The Dinar Hoard of Persian Sigloi" in Studies Price. (London, 1998).
Deutsch, R. & M. Heltzer. "Numismatic Evidence from the Persian Period from the Sharon Plain" Transeuphratene, Vol. 13, 1997, pp. 17-20.
Elayi, J. & A.G. Elayi. Le monnayage de la cité phénicienne de Sidon à l'époque perse (Ve-IVe s. av. J.-C.). (Paris, 2004).
Elayi, J. & A.G. Elayi. The Coinage of the Phoenician City of Tyre in the Persian Period (5th-4th cent. BCE). (Leuven-Paris-Walpole, MA, 2009).
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins, 5th Edition. (Amphora, 2010).
Meshorer, Y. A Treasury of Jewish Coins from the Persian Period to Bar Kokhba. (Jerusalem, 2001).
Mildenberg, L. "Yehud: A Preliminary Study of the Provincial Coinage of Judaea" in Essays Thompson (1979).
Meshorer, Y. & S. Qedar. The Coinage of Samaria in the 4th Century BCE. (Jerusalem, 1991).
Moysey, R.A. "The Silver Stater Issues of Pharnabazos and Datames from the Mint of Tarsus in Cilicia" in ANSMN 31 (1986).
Noe, S.P. Two Hoards of Persian Sigloi. ANSNNM 136. (New York, 1956).
Price, M.J. & N. Waggoner. Archaic Greek Silver Coinage, The "Asyut" Hoard. (London, 1975).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum. (Copenhagen, 1942-1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock. (Berlin, 1957-1967).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Finland, The Erkki Keckman Collection in the Skopbank, Helsinki, (Helsinki, 1994-1999).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale. (Paris, 1993 - 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Switzerland I. Levante-Cilicia. (Zurich,1986).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Troxell, H.A. "Orontes, satrap of Mysia" in SNR 60. (1981).
Vismara, N. Monetazione Arcaica della Lycia. (Milan, 1989 -1996).
Waggoner, N. M. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922 - 1929).

Catalog current as of Thursday, December 5, 2019.
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Persian Empire