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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |United Kingdom||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of the United Kingdom

Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI de Lancastre, King of France and England, 1422 - 1453, The Annunciation

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The obverse depicts the Annunciation, the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would be the mother of Jesus, the Son of God, marking his Incarnation.

This coin was struck at Dijon, a rare mint for the issue, which was minted in nine cities across France.

In 1422, the year old king of England inherited the French throne through his mad grandfather Charles VI of France; the iconography of this type represents the unification of the two nations. Ten years later Joan of Arc would make an appearance which would eventually loosen the English grip on France until by 1436 only Normandy and part of Maine remained in Henry's control.
SH79998. Gold Salut D'or, Schneider 102, Elias 268c, Duplessy 443, Lafaurie 447, gVF, weight 3.468 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Dijon mint, 2nd issue, 6 Sep 1423 - 1436; obverse vernicle, hENRICVS: DEI: GRA: FRACORV: AGLI: REX (Henry, by the grace of God, King of the Franks and English), double saltire stops, Virgin Mary, behind Arms of France, facing Angel Gabriel in profile left behind quartered Arms of France and England, light of God above AVE downward on scroll between them, within beaded circle; reverse vernicle, XPC'*VIHCIT'*XPC'*REGNAT'*XPC'*ImPERAT'* (Christ conquers, Christ reigns, Christ commands), mullet stops, central Latin cross, fleur de lis to left, lion to right, h below, all within tressure of ten arcs, fleur de lis on cusps, all within linear and beaded circle; this is a legend variety where Z is absent after FRACORV; very rare; SOLD


England, James I, 1603 - 1625

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James was King of Scots as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the English and Scottish crowns on 24 March 1603. He became King of Scotland at the age of thirteen months, succeeding his mother Mary, Queen of Scots, who had been compelled to abdicate in his favor. He succeeded the last Tudor monarch of England and Ireland, Elizabeth I, who died without issue. He reigned in all three kingdoms for 22 years, often using the title King of Great Britain and Ireland, until his death in 1625 at the age of 58. He based himself in England (the largest of the three realms) from 1603. James began the Plantation of Ulster and of North America. Under James, the "Golden Age" of Elizabethan literature and drama continued, with writers such as William Shakespeare contributing to a flourishing literary culture. He sponsored the translation of the Bible that was named after him: the Authorized King James Version.
SH56286. Gold halfcrown, Schneider 67, North 2093, SCBC 2629; im: rose, aVF, a few scratches, weight 1.211 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, second coinage, 1605 - 1606; obverse I D G ROSA SINE SPINA, crowned bust right; reverse TVEATVR VNITA DEVS (God upholds the united), crowned coat-of-arms, I - R across upper field; ex CNG, ex Deyo Collection, old round tag marked £3, 11/50; SOLD


England, King Cnut, 1016 - 1035 A.D.

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Cnut the Great was a king of Denmark, England, Norway, and parts of Sweden. He maintained power by uniting Danes and Englishmen under cultural bonds of wealth and custom, rather than by brutality. After the death of his heirs within a decade of his own and the Norman conquest of England in 1066, his legacy was largely lost to history.
WO67179. Silver penny, North 790, SCBC 1159, VF, weight 0.959 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Eadraed, London mint, c.1029 - 1035; obverse + CN-VT REX, diademed and cuirassed bust left, scepter with lis head; reverse + EDRED ON LVND, voided short cross with annulet in center; SOLD


England, Edward III, 1327 - 1377

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Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most efficient military powers in Europe. His reign saw vital developments in the evolution of the English parliament, the ravages of the Black Death and the beginning of the Hundred Years' War. He remained on the throne for 50 years.
UK77522. Silver groat, Lawrence Edward III 11/12; North 1249; SCBC 1616, gVF, toned, scratches to left of portrait under tone, weight 4.533 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 325o, London mint, Treaty period, 1361 - 1369; obverse + EDWARD DEI G REX AnGL DnS HIB Z AQT (Edward by the Grace of God King of England, France, Lord of Ireland and Aquitaine), crowned facing bust, within tressure of arches, with trefoils in spandrels; reverse + POSVI DEVm A DIVTOR Em mEV (I have made God my helper), CIVITAS LONDON (City of London), long cross with trefoil of pellets in each angle; ex CNG e-auction 249 (9 Feb 2011) lot 457 (realized $700 plus fees); ex Spink auction 194 (Prof. Colin Rochester Collection, 26 Mar 2008), lot 502 ; SOLD


England, Henry VIII, 1509 - 1547

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Henry VIII was the first English king of Ireland, oversaw the legal union of England and Wales, and continued the nominal claim to France. Besides his six marriages, he is known for his separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church. Despite converting money formerly paid to Rome into royal revenue, Henry was continually on the verge of financial ruin due to his personal extravagance and numerous costly wars. Henry applied theory of the divine right of kings to England. Charges of treason and heresy were used to quash dissent, and the accused were often executed without a formal trial. In his prime, Henry was considered attractive, educated, accomplished, and charismatic. As he aged, he became severely obese, his health suffered, and he became lustful, egotistical, and harsh.
UK77523. Silver groat, North 1797, SCBC 2337A, rose mint mark, VF, strong portrait, weight 2.625 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, London mint, second coinage, 1526 - 1544; obverse hENRIC VIII DI GRA REX AGL Z FRANC (Henry VIII by the Grace of God King of England and France), crowned bust right; reverse POSVI DEV' AVDIVTORE' MEV (I have made God my helper), royal arms (passant lions and fleurs-de-lis) over long cross fourchée; ex Wolfshead Gallery (2011); SOLD


England, Edward VI, 1547 - 1553

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Edward VI's reign was marked by economic problems, military withdrawal from Scotland and Boulogne-sur-Mer, and social unrest that in 1549 erupted into riot and rebellion. It also saw the transformation of the Anglican Church into a recognizably Protestant body.
UK86153. Silver shilling, SCBC 2466B, North 1917/2 (S), VF, toned, marks and scratches, underweight, weight 3.737 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Y mintmark, Southwark mint, second issue, 1549; obverse EDWARD VI D G ANGL FRA Z HIB REX (Edward VI by the Grace of God King of England, France and Ireland), crowned bust right, tall narrow bust with small crown; reverse TIMOR DOMINI FONS VITE M D XLIX (Fear of the Lord is the fountain of life, 1549), shield with heavy curved garniture, E - R (Edwardus Rex) at sides; scarce; SOLD


England, Edward I Longshanks, 1272 - 1307

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Elias notes, "In my experience for every 30 or 40 deniers with the EDWARD' FILI' legend only one with the EDWARDVS REX occurs."

Known as Edward Longshanks for his height of 6 ft. 2 in., and sometimes as the "Hammer of the Scots." Edward was ruthless in pursuing his aims and crushing those who opposed him. He conquered large parts of Wales and almost succeeding in doing the same to Scotland.
UK86321. Silver denier au lion, Elias 15 (RR), SCBC-SII 8016, Duplessy 1039, Poey d'Avant 2790, aVF, toned, scratches, earthen deposits, small edge crack, weight 0.736 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Aquitaine mint, 1272 - 1307; obverse + EDWARDVS REX (King Edward, S on its side), lion passant left within inner circle; reverse + DVX AqVITANIE (Duke of Aquitaine), cross pattée within inner circle; very rare; SOLD


Great Britain, Charles I, 1625 - 1649

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Charles I attempted to reign as an absolute monarch and rule without Parliament. Civil war broke out, the forces of the King lost, and Charles was beheaded.
SH84616. Silver shilling, SCBC 2791; North, group D, 2225, aVF, well centered, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 5.845 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 90o, Tower Mint mint, 1634 - 1635; obverse CAROLVS.D:G:MAG:BR:FR:ET:HI:REX. (Charles, by the grace of God, King of England, France and Ireland), crowned bust left, mark of value XII behind, no inner circle, bell mark; reverse CHRISTO AVSPICE REGNO (I reign under the auspices of Christ), bell mint mark, round garnished shield, no inner circle, no plum, no CR; SOLD


England, William I the Conqueror, 1066 - 1087 A.D.

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William I the Conqueror was Duke of Normandy and the first Norman King of England. In the 1050s and early 1060s William became a contender for the throne of England, then held by the childless Edward the Confessor, his first cousin once removed. There were other potential claimants, including the powerful English earl Harold Godwinson, who was named the next king by Edward on the latter's deathbed in January 1066. William argued that Edward had previously promised the throne to him and that Harold had sworn to support William's claim. William built a large fleet and invaded England in September 1066, decisively defeating and killing Harold at the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066. After further military efforts William was crowned king on Christmas Day 1066, in London. Several unsuccessful rebellions followed, but by 1075 William's hold on England was mostly secure, allowing him to spend most of the rest of his reign on the continent. William died in September 1087 while leading a campaign in northern France, and was buried in Caen. His reign in England was marked by the construction of castles, the settling of a new Norman nobility on the land, and change in the composition of the English clergy. He did not try to integrate his various domains into one empire but instead continued to administer each part separately. William's lands were divided after his death: Normandy went to his eldest son, Robert Curthose, and his second surviving son, William Rufus, received England. This type is believed to be the last type of William I's reign. It may have continued into the reign of William II.
UK91703. Silver penny, PAXS type; SCBC 1257, North 848, BMC Norman Kings 8, SCBI -, aEF, light tone on luster, die wear, parts of legends weak, tight flan, weight 1.377 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, moenyer Aefwine, Wilton mint, c. 1083 - 1087; obverse + PILLELM REX, crowned and diademed bust facing, trefoil scepter in right hand held over left shoulder; reverse + IELFPINE ON PIIL (or similar), cross pattée, within each angle an annulet containing one letter of the the word PAXS; SOLD


England, Edward VI, 1547 - 1553

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"Local dies" of very attractive style.

Edward VI's reign was marked by economic problems, military withdrawal from Scotland and Boulogne-sur-Mer, and social unrest that in 1549 erupted into riot and rebellion. It also saw the transformation of the Anglican Church into a recognisably Protestant body.
WO32908. Copper shilling, contemporary imitation of a base shilling, cf. SCBC 2466, VF, weight 4.891 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, die axis 180o, Bristol? mint, 1549; obverse EDWARD VI D G ANGL FRA Z HIB REX (Edward VI by the Grace of God King of England, France and Ireland), crowned bust right; reverse TIMOR DOMINI FONS VITE M D XLIX (Fear of the Lord is the fountain of life, 1549), shield with heavy curved garniture, E R at sides; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Borden D. & I. Brown. "The Milled Coinage of Elizabeth I" in BNJ vol 53. (1983). pp. 108 - 132.
Brown, I., C. Comber, & W. Wilkinson. The Hammered Silver Coins Produced at the Tower Mint During the Reign of Elizabeth I. (Llanfyllin, 2012).
Bull, M. English Silver Coinage Since 1649. (London, 2015).
Davies, P. British Silver Coins Since 1816. (1982).
Elias, E. The Anglo-Gallic Coins. (Paris/London, 1984).
Everson, T. The Galata Guide to the Farthing Tokens of James I and Charles I: A History and Reclassification. (Llanfyllin, 2008).
Freeman, M. Bronze Coinage of Great Britain. (London, 1985).
Krause C. & Mishler, C. Standard Catalog of World Coins. (Iola, WI, 2010 - )
Lawrence, L. "The Coinage of Edward III from 1351" in NC 1926, 1929, 1932, 1933.
Marsh, M. The Gold Half Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2004).
Marsh, M. The Gold Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2002).
Mass, J. Mass Collection, English Short Cross Coins, 1180-1247. SCBI 56. (Oxford, 2001).
Montagu, H. The copper, tin and bronze coinage and patterns for coins of England, from the reign of Elizabeth to that of Her present Majesty. (London, 1893).
Nelson, P. The Coinage of William Wood, 1722-1733. (Brighton, 1903).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 1: Early Anglo-Saxon to Henry 111 c. A.D. 600-1272. (London, 1994).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 2: Edward 1 to Charles 11 1272-1662. (London, 1991).
North, J. & P. Preston-Morley. Brooker Collection, Coins of Charles I. SCBI 33. (London, 1984).
Peck, C. English Copper, Tin and Bronze Coins in the British Museum, 1558-1958. (London, 1964).
Spink. Coins of England & the United Kingdom, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (London, 2012).
Spink. Coins of Scotland, Ireland and the Islands (Jersey, Guernsey, Man and Lundy) Pre-Decimal Issues, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (Cambridge, 2003).
Wilson, A. & M. Rasmussen. English Pattern Trial and Proof Coins in Gold 1547-1968. (Cambridge, 2000).
Withers, P. & B. Small Change I - V Farthings and Halfpennies. (Llanfyllin, 2003 - 2005).
Withers, P. & B., & S. Ford. Anglo-Gallic Coins - Monnaies Anglo-Francaises. (Llanfyllin, 2015).
Woodhead, P. & D. Liddell. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume One, English Gold Coins and their Imitations, Henry III to Elizabeth I, 1257-1603. (London, 1996).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Two, English Gold Coins, 1603-20th Century. (London, 2002).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Three, Anglo-Gallic, Flemish and Brabantine Gold Coins, 1330 - 1794. (London, 2011).

Catalog current as of Monday, November 18, 2019.
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UK Coins