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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Travel & Transporation||View Options:  |  |  |   

Travel & Geography on Ancient Coins

Here we depict coins that relate to travel but also to places in the ancient world. We will also include coins from the less common cities and mints when we want to share information about the location.


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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In 97 A.D., the future emperor Trajan was made governor in Germania and adopted as "Caesar" or heir by Nerva.
SH46865. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 98, BMCRE III 134; BnF III 119, Cohen II 72, SRCV II 3045, gVF, nice portrait, areas of light corrosion, weight 20.781 g, maximum diameter 32.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 18 Sep - Dec 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P II COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNA AVGVST (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) across field; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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The rabbit on the reverse is in reference to the Roman province of Hispania Baetica and the issue is an appeal for the aid of the gods as during Hadrian's first travels around the empire, leaving Rome in 121. On this example, Minerva is shown in her "peace-giving" aspect versus her more often seen guise of war.
SH34690. Gold aureus, Calico 1309 var. (obv legend break), RIC II 70 var. (same plus portrait and spear vice scepter); BMC 117 - 118 var. (same); SRCV II -, VF, some circulation marks, weight 7.129 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 122 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HA-DRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right from behind; reverse P M TR P COS III, Minerva standing facing, helmeted head left, long scepter in left hand, right hand pointing to Spanish olive tree on left, rabbit right at the base of the tree; ex Munzhandlung Basel, 6 March 1936 (Dr. H St. S & Prince Waldeck); very rare; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck. Fortuna Redux brought one safely home, in this case the emperor. The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Syria and Egypt. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel (the wheel of fortune), entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
SH91180. Gold aureus, SRCV II 3092 (same dies), Woytek 525f-1, RIC II 319, BMCRE III 569, Calico I 1026, BnF IV 805, Cohen II 153, Strack 235, Hunter II 186, Choice gVF, some mint luster, well centered, handsome portrait, flow lines, some light marks, weight 7.203 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late 114 - beginning 116 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Fortuna seated left on chair without back, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, FORT RED in exergue; ex Malter auction XLVII (4 Feb 1992), lot 359; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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In 116, Trajan completed his invasion of Parthia by capturing the cities of Seleucia, Babylon, Ctesiphon and Susa, marking the high-water mark of the Roman Empire's eastern expansion. Trajan made Syria a Roman province and crossed the Tigris to annex Adiabene. He proceeded with his army to the Persian Gulf and conquered territory that became the province of Parthia. This coin was dedicated to Fortune to obtain her support for Trajan's safe return to Rome.
SH65969. Gold aureus, Calico 1026a, Cohen II 153, RIC II 318, BMCRE III 569 ff. var. (draped and cuirassed), VF, weight 6.993 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 116 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse FORT RED (in exergue), P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Fortuna seated left on chair without back, holding tiller and rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck. Fortuna Redux brought one safely home. This coin was struck to honor Fortuna, to gain her support in ensuring the safe return of Titus from Judaea.
SH37555. Gold aureus, RIC II-1 1111; BnF III 292; SRCV I -, nice F, weight 6.908 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 225o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG TR P, laureate head right; reverse FORT RED COS III, Fortuna standing right, globe in extended right, caduceus in left; unusual Fortuna composition; SOLD


Myrina, Aeolis, mid 2nd Century B.C.

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At the time this coin was issued, Myrina was a thriving town popular with tourists and known for its terracotta, glassware, and oysters. The site of Myrina was discovered at the mouth of the river that was the ancient Pythicos, whose alluvia have covered what was the city's harbor. Excavations (1880-1882) brought to light about four thousand tombs, dating from the last two centuries B.C., in which were found numerous objects representing the divinities of the Greek pantheon; children's toys, reproductions of famous works, etc. Most of these may be seen today in the Museum of the Louvre.
SH20288. Silver stephanophoric tetradrachm, Sacks 20, SNG Cop 223, SNG Lockett 2222, Pozzi 2306, SNGvA -, SNG Ash -, SNG Mn -, BMC Troas -, EF, weight 16.914 g, maximum diameter 31.1 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Myrina (near Aliaga, Turkey) mint, obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair braided, ribbons flowing behind; reverse MYPINAIΩN, Apollo Grynios advancing right holding patera and laurel branch with fillets; omphalos and amphora at feet; (ΠA monogram) left, all within laurel wreath; superb style, a gem!; SOLD


Myrina, Aeolis, mid 2nd Century B.C.

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Myrina is said to have been founded before the other Aeolian cities by either Myrinus or the Amazon Myrina. Artaxerxes gave Gryneium and Myrina to Gongylus, an Eretrian, who had been banished from his native city for favoring Persia. Myrina had a good harbor. Pliny the Elder mentions the fame of its oysters and that it bore the surname of Sebastopolis (venerable city). An inscription tells us that Myrina was within the Kingdom of Pergamon in the 3rd century B.C. For some time Myrina was occupied by Philip V of Macedon; but the Romans compelled him to evacuate, and declared the place free. It twice suffered severe earthquakes, in the reigns of Tiberius and Trajan. The town was restored each time, and continued to exist until a late period. It was the birthplace of Agathias, a Byzantine poet and historian of the 6th century.
GS38437. Silver stephanophoric tetradrachm, Sacks 20, SNG Cop 223, SNG Lockett 2222, Pozzi 2306, SNGvA -, SNG Ash -, SNG Mn -, BMC Troas -, EF, weight 16.589 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Myrina (near Aliaga, Turkey) mint, obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair braided, ribbons flowing behind; reverse MYPINAIΩN, Apollo Grynios advancing right holding patera and laurel branch with fillets; omphalos and amphora at feet; (ΠA monogram) left, all within laurel wreath; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RB74020. Orichalcum sestertius, Woytek 505v-1, RIC II 651, Strack I 454, Cohen II 157, BMCRE III - (p. 216, note), BnF IV -, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, Choice VF, well centered, excellent portrait, near black patina, closed edge crack, some marks, light corrosion, weight 27.878 g, maximum diameter 35.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late summer - autumn 114 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS, Fortuna seated left on low chair without back, veiled and draped, feet on footstool, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, FORT RED over S C in exergue; ex Italian collection (anonymous dealer or collector tag in Italian); SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is an ancient Roman temple in Rome, adapted as a Roman Catholic church, Chiesa di San Lorenzo in Miranda. It is in the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, opposite the Regia. The temple was begun by Antoninus Pius in 141 and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 AD, the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius. The ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its pronaos are 17 metres high. The rich bas-reliefs of the frieze under the cornice, of garlanded griffons and candelabri, were often copied from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. San Lorenzo in Miranda
RB87194. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 746a, Cohen II 464, Hunter II 211, BMCRE IV 1641, SRCV II 4185, VF, well centered, excellent portrait, attractive reverse style, turning marks, light corrosion, porous, weight 25.180 g, maximum diameter 34.07 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 140 - 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right; reverse Italia seated left on celestial globe, wearing turreted crown, holding cornucopia before her in right hand, short scepter in left hand and cradled in left arm, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, ITALIA in exergue; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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On 4 February 211, Severus fell ill and died in York at the age of 65, after a reign of nearly 18 years. This coin was dedicated to Fortuna to secure her aid for Caracalla's safe return to Rome from Britain.
SH57744. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 479(a), Cohen IV 85, cf. SRCV II 6921 (COS III), gVF, full flan, weight 22.033 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 211 A.D.; obverse M AVREL ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right with short beard; reverse FORT RED P M TR P XIIII COS IIII P P S C, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, scepter in left hand, wheel under seat; nice green patina, attractive coin; scarce; SOLD




  




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Travel & Geography