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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Pautalia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Pautalia, Thrace

The site of Pautalia (modern Kyustendil, Bulgaria) was settled in the Iron Age by the Thracian Dentheletes tribe. It was located near thermal springs and remains of the ancient city include a temple of Asclepios and Roman baths. In the 1990s, excavation of nearby 2nd century A.D. tumuli unearthed bronze surgical instruments and a small bronze case containing a variety of medicines.


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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Pautalia was located near thermal springs and remains of the ancient city include a temple of Asklepios. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. In the 1990s, excavation of nearby 2nd century A.D. tumuli unearthed bronze surgical instruments and a small bronze case containing a variety of medicines.
SH63235. Bronze AE 32, Varbanov II 4972 (he notes, otherwise unpublished), F, some earthen encrustation, weight 19.76 g, maximum diameter 31.9 mm, die axis 45o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, magistrate Caecina Largus, 198 - 201 A.D.; obverse AYT M AYPHΛIOC - ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, young bust right, from behind; reverse HΓE KAIKINA ΓΛAPOY OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, tetrastyle temple of Asklepios, front and right side seen in perspective, statue of Asklepios holding snake entwined staff in center, three steps; sculptures of a bull on left and male figure on right each on high base, trees flanking behind; very rare; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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RP38107. Bronze AE 31, Varbanov II 5411 var. (draped bust, plain head snake), Choice VF, weight 18.182 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, die axis 30o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AVT K Π CEΠTI ΓETAC, laureate head right; reverse OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, fourfold coiled snake, forked tail, head nimbate and radiate; rare; SOLD


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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Ancient architectural types rarely depict such accurate perspective.
RP56406. Bronze AE 20, Varbanov II 4610 (same dies?), Ruzicka 258, Price-Trell 102, SNG Cop -, SNG Mnchen -, SNG Righetti -, Lindgren -, BMC Thrace -, aEF, corrosion on edges, weight 2.924 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 45o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AY KAI KOMO∆OC, laureate bust right; reverse OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, tetrastyle temple 3/4 view in perspective, flanked by trees, statue of Asclepius standing facing holding serpent-staff inside; rare; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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RP28143. Bronze AE 30, Varbanov II 5104, gF, weight 17.163 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 180o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AYT K M AYPH ANTΩNEINOC, laureate bust right; reverse OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, Herakles standing half-right, leaning on club in right, apples of the Hesperides in left, Nemean lion-skin hanging from arm; scarce; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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The site of Pautalia (modern Kyustendil, Bulgaria) was settled in the Iron Age by the Thracian Dentheletes tribe. It was located near thermal springs and remains of the ancient city include a temple of Asklepios and Roman baths. In the 1990s, excavation of nearby 2nd century A.D. tumuli unearthed bronze surgical instruments and a small bronze case containing a variety of medicines.
RP65136. Bronze AE 25, Apparently unpublished; Ruzicka -, Varbanov II -, Moushmov -, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, weight 7.035 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 0o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AYT Λ CEΠ CEYHPOC ΠEP CEB, laureate head right.; reverse OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, Nike in biga right, reins in right, palm frond in left; very rare; SOLD


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus, Pautalia, Thrace

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The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP10047. Bronze AE 25, Varbanov II 4519, aF, weight 10.10 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, 161 - 169 A.D.; obverse ΛOYKIΛΛA CEBACTH, draped bust right, hair knotted in chignon low at back; reverse OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, coiled snake; very rare; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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The bull reverse appears to be unpublished for Pautalia. A close relative of the issue is the lion walking right, with the legend divided in a similar way, Varbanov 5391 - 5393.
RP26009. Bronze AE 19, Varbanov II -, apparently unpublished, aVF, weight 2.680 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse Π Λ CEΠT ΓETAC, draped bust right; reverse OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, bull walking right; very rare; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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Homonoia was the goddess (or spirit or personification) of harmony, concord, unanimity, and oneness of mind. She is usually depicted either seated or standing with a cornucopia.
RP29048. Bronze AE 23, Varbanov II 4911 var. (rev. legend), aVF, weight 7.867 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆OMNA CEB, draped bust right; reverse ΠAYTAΛEΩTΩN (sic), Homonoia standing left, patera in extended right, cornucopia in left; very rare ethnic spelling; SOLD


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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The Three Graces (Charities), named Euphrosyne (Joy), Aglaia (Splendor) and Thalia (Good Cheer), were the attendants of Venus (Aphrodite). They are shown on Roman provincial coins as a statuary group, sometimes nude or partially nude, and sometimes holding apples. In Pautalia, they were tutelary goddesses of the local mineral springs.
RP63240. Bronze AE 30, RPC online 10190, Staal -, Imhoof-Blumer Nymphen -, Varbanov II -, Ruzicka -, SNG -, BMC -, Lindgren -, Moushmov -, aF, scratches, weight 16.03 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 15o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, magistrate Julius Castus, 184 - 185 A.D.; obverse AY KAI MAP AYPHΛI KOMMO∆OC...., head right; reverse HΓE IOY KACTOY OYΛΠIAC (clockwise from (9:00), ΠAYTAΛI/AC (in exergue), the Three Charites (Graces) dancing arm-in-arm, Euphrosyne in center seen from behind draped below buttocks, Aglaea and Thalia seen from front, tripod left; extremely rare; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

Click for a larger photo
The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP68945. Bronze AE 17, Ruzicka 843, Moushmov 4335, Varbanov II -, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, well centered, weight 2.710 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, as caesar, 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse Π CEΠTI ΓETA KAI, bare-headed draped youth bust right, from behind; reverse ΠAYTAΛIAC, snake rising in three coils around omphalos, head left, on top of garlanded column altar; very rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Ruzicka, L. Die Mnzen von Pautalia. (Sofia, 1933).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, SNG Grce, Collection Rna H. Evelpidis, Part 1: Italie. Sicile - Thrace. (Athens, 1970).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II. Mnzen derAntike. Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (1993).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, (English Edition), Vol. II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia). (Bourgas, 2005).

Catalog current as of Thursday, November 21, 2019.
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Pautalia