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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Provenance ▸ Plate CoinsView Options:  |  |  | 

Plate Coins

The coins below were once photographed and the photograph was included in the plates of a book, periodical or other reference. Often plate coins are superb examples of the type and were part of a famous collection.


Leontini, Sicily, c. 405 - 402 B.C.

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Leontini was founded as by colonists from Naxos in 729 BC, itself a Chalcidian colony established five years earlier. It was the only significant Greek settlement in Sicily not located on the coast, being some 6 miles inland. The site, originally held by the Sicels, was seized by the Greeks owing to its command of the fertile plain to the north. The city was reduced to subject status in 498 BC by Hippocrates of Gela, and in 476 BC Hieron of Syracuse moved the inhabitants from Catania and Naxos to Leontini.
GI86576. Bronze tetras, Calciati III p. 77, 3/27 (this coin); SNG Cop 360; SNG ANS 270; SNG Morcom 606; SNG Lloyd 1070; BMC Sicily p. 92, 56; Laffaille 169; HGC 2 709 (R1), gVF, dark patina, well centered and struck, weight 2.165 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, Leontini mint, c. 405 - 402 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, olive leaf and olive behind; reverse tripod lebes with loop handles, a barley kernel flanking on each side, kithara between legs of tripod, three pellets in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 6 (22 Feb 2014), lot 45; Calciati III plate coin! ; $180.00 (Ä153.00)


Apameia, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 83 - 82 B.C.

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Apamea is believed to be the Biblical city Shepham (Num. xxxiv. 11). Rome received Apamea with the Pergamene Kingdom in 133 B.C., but sold it to Mithridates V of Pontus, who held it till 120 BC. After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. Pompey razed the fortress and annexed the city to Rome in 64 B.C. Apamea is mentioned in the Talmud (Ber. 62a, Niddah, 30b and Yeb. 115b). By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C. In the revolt of Syria under Q. Caecilius Bassus, it held out against Julius Caesar for three years until the arrival of Cassius in 46 B.C.Great Colonnade at Apamea
GY86697. Bronze AE 14, Lindgren-Kovacs 2035 (this coin), Cohen DCA 415 (R2, same dies), HGC 9 1433 (R1) var. (year 237), SNG Cop -, BMC Galatia -, VF, obverse die wear, tight flan, weight 1.678 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 83 - 82 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wreathed in ivy; reverse bunch of grapes, AΠAMEΩN / THΣ IEPAΣ − KAI AΣYΛOY / ΣE (in four downward lines, the first two on right, the last two on the left), ΘΛΣ (year 239 of the Seleukid Era) downward low inner right; ex J.S. Wagner Collection, Lindgren-Kovacs plate coin; very rare; $90.00 (Ä76.50)


Nagidos, Cilicia, c. 380 - 360 B.C.

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This is the SNG Levante plate coin.

Nagidos, a colony of Samos, was located in Cilicia on a hill at the mouth of the Sini Cay (Bozyazi Dere) near modern Bozyazi in Mersin Province, Turkey. Nagidos minted coins with a grape cluster as a symbol of the city, some with both Greek and Aramaic inscriptions, and one type bearing the name of the Persian satrap Pharnabazus. Aphrodite appears most often on the coins, indicating her sanctuary was the most important in the city. Alexander the Great conquered Cilicia in 133 B.C. After his death, Cilicia briefly came under Seleucid rule. About 270 B.C., the Ptolemaic Empire conquered Cilicia. When the city of Arsinoe was founded on land claimed by Nagidos, the Nagidians refused to recognize the settlers. To resolve the dispute, Nagidos was designated as the mother city and the citizens of both shared a single citizenship. Cilicia came under Seleucid rule in 197 B.C. Nagidos was abandoned in the middle of the second century B.C., possibly due to attacks by the Cilician pirates.
SH13725. Silver stater, SNG Levante supplement 1 (this coin), SNG Cop 179, cf. Lederer Nagidos 24, SNG BnF 21 (similar, different controls), aEF, fantastic rainbow toning, flat strike on faces, weight 10.694 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Nagidos (Bozyazi, Turkey) mint, c. 365 B.C.; obverse Aphrodite enthroned left, patera in outstretched right, Eros standing behind; reverse NAΓI∆IKΩN, Dionysos standing left, bunch of vine with bunch of grapes in right, thyrsus in left, monogram left; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Sunday, April 22, 2018.
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Plate Coins