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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Severan Period ▸ Aquilia SeveraView Options:  |  |  | 

Aquilia Severa, Augusta 221 - 222 A.D.

Aquilia Severa was the second and fourth wife of Elagabalus. She was a Vestal Virgin and Elagabalus was the high priest of the sun-god Heliogabal. Elagabalus held parallel marriage ceremonies; Elagabalus married Aquilia and Heliogabal married Vesta. This was extremely offensive to the Romans since Vestal Virgins were prohibited from marriage during their 30-year vow of chastity. Elagabalus and Aquilia, as well as Heliogabal and Vesta, were divorced in order to restore public confidence and Elagabalus was quickly remarried. However, Elagabalus divorced his third wife within a few months and remarried Aquilia Severa. Returning to Aquilia Severa sealed his fate. Elagabalus and his mother were murdered; their bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome and thrown into the Tiber.


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Aquilia Severa was the second and fourth wife of Elagabalus. She was a Vestal Virgin and Elagabalus was the high priest of the sun-god Heliogabal. Elagabalus held parallel marriage ceremonies; Elagabalus married Aquilia and Heliogabal married Vesta. This was extremely offensive to the Romans since Vestal Virgins were prohibited from marriage during their 30-year vow of chastity. Elagabalus and Aquilia, as well as Heliogabal and Vesta, were divorced in order to restore public confidence and Elagabalus was quickly remarried. However, Elagabalus divorced his third wife within a few months and remarried Aquilia Severa. Returning to Aquilia Severa sealed his fate. Elagabalus and his mother were murdered; their bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome and thrown into the Tiber.
SH33429. Silver denarius, RIC IV E225 (S), RSC III 2a, BMCRE V E185, SRCV II 7679 var. (star right), EF, sharp, mint luster, a few small dark spots, weight 2.599 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 221 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AQVILIA SEVERA AVG, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia standing half left, sacrificing from patera in right over lit altar, double cornucopia in left hand, star upper left; scarce; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Aquilia Severa was the second and fourth wife of Elagabalus. She was a Vestal Virgin and Elagabalus was the high priest of the sun-god Heliogabal. Elagabalus held parallel marriage ceremonies; Elagabalus married Aquilia and Heliogabal married Vesta. This was extremely offensive to the Romans since Vestal Virgins were prohibited from marriage during their 30-year vow of chastity. Elagabalus and Aquilia, as well as Heliogabal and Vesta, were divorced in order to restore public confidence and Elagabalus was quickly remarried. However, Elagabalus divorced his third wife within a few months and remarried Aquilia Severa. Returning to Aquilia Severa sealed his fate. Elagabalus and his mother were murdered; their bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome and thrown into the Tiber.
SH29040. Silver denarius, RIC IV E225 (S), RSC III 2a, BMCRE V E185, SRCV II 7679 var. (star right), VF, toned, weight 2.372 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 221 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AQVILIA SEVERA AVG, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia standing half left, sacrificing from patera in right over lit altar, double cornucopia in left hand, star left; ex CNG Sale 35 (September 1995), lot 886; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Aquilia Severa was the second and fourth wife of Elagabalus. She was a Vestal Virgin and Elagabalus was the high priest of the sun-god Heliogabal. Elagabalus held parallel marriage ceremonies; Elagabalus married Aquilia and Heliogabal married Vesta. This was extremely offensive to the Romans since Vestal Virgins were prohibited from marriage during their 30-year vow of chastity. Elagabalus and Aquilia, as well as Heliogabal and Vesta, were divorced in order to restore public confidence and Elagabalus was quickly remarried. However, Elagabalus divorced his third wife within a few months and remarried Aquilia Severa. Returning to Aquilia Severa sealed his fate. Elagabalus and his mother were murdered; their bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome and thrown in the Tiber.
RS79623. Silver denarius, RIC IV E228 (R), RSC III 6, BMCRE V E337, SRCV II 7680, Hunter III -, VF, porous, edge cracks, reverse slightly off center , weight 2.590 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 220 - 222 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AQVILIA SEVERA AVG, draped bust right, head bare, neatly waved and fastened in a queue at the back; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Aquilia Severa and Elagabalus standing facing one another, clasping hands, she wears a stephane, with a fold of drapery over her arm, he holds a roll in his left hand, star between them below hands; rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

IVLIAAQVILIASEVERAAVG

REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Caliců, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappťes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H.B., E.A. Sydenham & C.H.V. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Mouchmov, N.A. Le Tresor Numismatique De Reka-Devnia (Marcianopolis). (Sofia, 1934).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H.A. & Sear, D.R. Roman Silver Coins, Volume III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Saturday, April 29, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Aquilia Severa